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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 16 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 30, 1863., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for Raccoon Ford (Virginia, United States) or search for Raccoon Ford (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
of bread and a Bologna sausage, to the astonishment of the old campaigners, who enquired, Whether I had a pontoon bridge about me? Then I rolled myself in my coat and took a good night's sleep on the floor. The next morning we started for Raccoon Ford, on the Rapidan, five miles distant. The enemy were mostly across and only opposed us with a few skirmishers. As we got in sight of it, the prospect was not cheering. The opposite bank, partly wooded and partly covered with cultivation, roser nothing much of the Insurges, but are all ready to pitch into them if we find them in a soft spot. . . . [At this time Meade's main line was from Rapidan Station, where the railroad from Alexandria to Charlottesville crosses the river, to Raccoon Ford, some seven miles down the Rapidan. During the following days there was a series of minor engagements, Lee endeavoring to turn Meade's right flank, and get between him and Washington. But Meade, outmarching Lee, kept between him and Washingt
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 3 (search)
nt to that place from the army in our front. B. then said he was going to move on Richmond, or something of the sort, and would like a demonstration not later than Saturday (to-morrow). S. said it was too short a time to make any great show and that it would spoil our chances for a surprise on their works, in future. H. then telegraphed to do, at any rate, what we could. So Kilpatrick has been sent to their right via Mine Ford, and Merritt is to threaten Barnett's Ford; and to threaten Raccoon Ford, while the 2d will make a stronger demonstration at Morton's Ford. Old Sedgwick and General Humphreys are cross at the whole thing, looking on it as childish. February 7, 1864 It is one in the morning and I have, so to speak, just taken a midnight dinner, having come in from the front between 11 and 12 oclock. Well, who would have thought of marching out of comfortable winter quarters, to go poking round the Rapidan! . . . Only last night orders were suddenly issued to the 1st and 2
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
they will plunder and they won't fight. Really, as soldiers, they are miserable. Actually, a Yankee regiment would drive a brigade of them. They have no grit as a rule. The Paddies, on the contrary, will go in finely, and if well officered, stand to it through everything. . . . Having ascertained the Headquarters, I rode over to Mrs. Newton's, where I found a romantic lot of officers reposing, very flat on the grass. . . . Poor Mrs. Newton!--she was the one whose husband fell in my Raccoon Ford fight. . . . Presently arrived an aunt, a Mrs. Brockenbrough, a conceited, curious, sallow, middle-aged woman, itching to tackle a Northerner. She said the Cavalry Provost-Marshal had been very kind to her. She then began to catechize Grant, with an eager relish, who replied with entire calmness and candor, whereat she was plainly taken aback, as she looked for a volley of gasconade! Their negro houses were full of wounded cavalry men, some of them Rebels. As we sat there the cavalry c
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
Plunder, demoralizing effect, 40; Hancock and, 288. Point of Rocks, Appomattox River, 193. Pontoon bridge, 130, 159. Po-Ny, 119. Pope, John, 60. Poplar Grove church, 234. Porter, David Dixon, 249. Porter, Georgia Ann (Patterson), 249. Porter, Horace, 142. Potter, Alonzo, 167. Potter, Robert Barnwell, 166, 212, 219, 234, 237, 296, 297, 334. Pourtales, Louis Auguste de, 212. Pratt, Mary, 26. Prisoners, provost, 13; Rebel, 32, 45, 324, 836, 347. Punishments, 243. Raccoon Ford, 19, 68, 69. Races, horse, 321. Railroad construction, 311. Rapidan River, 51. Rawlins, John Aaron, 91n, 114n. Reams' station, 224, 234. Rebels, fighting qualities, 87, 99, 100, 208; privations, 132; valuable qualities, 186; wearing down, 245, 271; deserters, 305, 310; appearance, 324, 360. Revere, Paul Joseph, 34. Review of troops, 9, 316, 318; 2d corps, 75; 9th corps, 261. Rice, James Clay, 109, 180. Rice's station, 352. Richmond, fall of, 343. Ricketts, Jame