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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 703 687 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 558 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 529 203 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 90 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 83 23 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 81 23 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 68 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 66 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 62 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) or search for Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Recollections of Grant. (search)
o calling the centuries to witness. There was no nonsense, no sentiment; only a plain business man of the republic, there for the one single purpose of getting that command across the river in the shortest time possible. On a horse near by, and among the still mounted staff, sat the general's son, a bright-looking lad of about eleven years. Fastened to his little waist, by the broad yellow belt, was his father's sword — that sword on whose clear steel was soon to be engraved Vicksburg, Spottsylvania, the Wilderness, and Richmond. The boy talked and jested with the bronzed soldiers near him, who laughingly inquired where.we should camp; to which the young field marshal replied: Over the river! Over the river! Ah! that night we slept with our guns in our hands; and another night, and another, saw more than one of our division camped beyond and over the river — in that last tenting-ground where the reveille was heard no more forever. I next saw Grant on May 18th, 1863, and this
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
nce William, and Stafford counties. So well did he perform this hazardous service, that he has left with the people of those localities many a thrilling tale of his daring and hair-breadth escapes. In consequence of information sent by Sergeant Reid, that the Federal army was moving toward the Rappahannock, furnished with eight days cooked rations, and sixty rounds of ammunition, General Lee withdrew to the south side of the Rapidan. During this movement Meade advanced to Mine run, in Spottsylvania, where an undecided affair took place between the two armies, the Fourth Virginia Cavalry holding Roberson's ford on the Rapidan and repelling the efforts of the enemy's cavalry to effect a passage of the river at that point. From this point the Black Horse, with the exception of Sergeant Reid's party, were sent to Upper Fauquier and Loudon counties to observe and report the enemy's movements, on which duty they remained during the winter, at the close of which they were ordered to repo