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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 703 687 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 558 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 529 203 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 90 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 83 23 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 81 23 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 68 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 66 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 62 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) or search for Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Heroes of the old Camden District, South Carolina, 1776-1861. an Address to the Survivors of Fairfield county, delivered at Winnsboro, S. C., September 1,1888. (search)
regiment lost eighteen killed, wounded and missing. Then came the great campaign of 1864, and in its first battle, the Wilderness, the Twelfth had another gallant colonel killed, Colonel John L. Miller, and with him fell Lieutenants J. L. McKnight and J. A. Gavin. Lieutenant-Colonel E. F. Bookter and Lieutenants J. A. Watson and J. A. Beard were wounded. There were sixteen killed, sixty-four wounded and five missing in this regiment. Then again the regiment suffered most heavily at Spotsylvania. It entered the Bloody Angle at the point of greatest danger—just at the break. They lost fearfully but fought nobly, 28 were killed, 38 wounded and 52 missing—118. Lieutenants J. B. Blackman and J. R. Faulkenburg were killed, and Captain W. J. Stover, Lieutenants Wade Reeves and W. B. White wounded. In the affairs from the 12th of May to 1st of July, 1864, the Twelfth lost 2 killed, 21 wounded and 11 missing—34. Major T. F. Clyburne and Lieutenant W. H. Rives were wounded. Lieutenant<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
1859, the average loss of both armies was less than nine per cent. At Koniggratz, in 1866, it was six per cent. At Worth, Specheran, Mars la Tour, Gravelotte and Sedan, in 1870, the average loss was twelve per cent. At Linden General Moreau lost but four per cent., and the Archduke John lost but seven per cent. in killed and wounded. Americans can scarcely call this a lively skirmish. At Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Atlanta, Gettysburg, Missionary Ridge, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania, the loss frequently reached and sometimes exceeded forty per cent., and the average of killed and wounded, on one side or the other, was over thirty per cent. And when it is considered that this degree of bitter fighting was persistently maintained by both sides throughout the two entire days without any defensive works deserving of the name, and for the most part without any at all, except as the natural features of the ground supplied them in part to the Union side, it is readily s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
1859, the average loss of both armies was less than nine per cent. At Koniggratz, in 1866, it was six per cent. At Worth, Specheran, Mars la Tour, Gravelotte and Sedan, in 1870, the average loss was twelve per cent. At Linden General Moreau lost but four per cent., and the Archduke John lost but seven per cent. in killed and wounded. Americans can scarcely call this a lively skirmish. At Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Atlanta, Gettysburg, Missionary Ridge, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania, the loss frequently reached and sometimes exceeded forty per cent., and the average of killed and wounded, on one side or the other, was over thirty per cent. And when it is considered that this degree of bitter fighting was persistently maintained by both sides throughout the two entire days without any defensive works deserving of the name, and for the most part without any at all, except as the natural features of the ground supplied them in part to the Union side, it is readily s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
in, 34; indebtedness of the Nation to, 440; New, 425: Old (Address by Gen. D. H. Hill), 425; meagre resources of 282, 427, 438; patriotism of, 33, 354; proportion of males in army of, 437. Southern-born Generals in the Federal army, 436; in the U. S. army, 437; genius developed by the war, 281; religious sentiment of the soldiers, 195; their heroism, 222. 416; fortitude and sufferings of, 290; resorts of necessity and inventions, 292. Spartan Scytale Cypher, 103. Spinola, 447. Spotsylvania. Battle of, 21. Spring Hill, Battle of, 352, 373. Stafford, Gen, 450. Staley's Creek, 65. Stamp Act, The, 3, 6, 431. Stanley, Col. W. A., 304. Staples, Hon. W. R., 271. Steadman, Col. James M., 16. Stedman. Lt. A. J., 92. Steele, Capt., 25. Stephens, Hon. A. H., 273. Sterrett, Capt., 88. Stevens, Col. C. H., 136, 140, 143, 144. Stevens, Gen.. 428. Stevens, J. Adger, 175. Stevens, Rev. Mr., 128. Stewart, Gen. A. P., 244, 312, 387. Stewart, Major. 72. Stewart,