hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 703 687 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 558 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 529 203 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 90 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 83 23 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 81 23 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 68 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 66 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 62 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) or search for Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Trees whittled down at Horseshoe. (search)
nted was guns and men were detailed and loaded with guns and sent in the trenches, and in this way Pegram's brigade was supplied with guns that they could use. I know of no other instance of that kind, and never heard of one. The march to Spotsylvania. On the 8th we marched to Spotsylvania, and, as before stated, there was no rest for our troops that day and night. My recollection is that I had been in my saddle almost continuously since the morning of May 5th, and on the morning of theSpotsylvania, and, as before stated, there was no rest for our troops that day and night. My recollection is that I had been in my saddle almost continuously since the morning of May 5th, and on the morning of the 9th, after having been in my saddle all night, I almost fell from my horse about daylight, and went to sleep near where I had tied him under a tree, but was soon waked up by his restlessness, caused by bullets flying around him. I speak of myself only to illustrate the conditions of hardship we had endured. But General Johnson was in his saddle all night, doing the best he could without any assistance from engineers or from any person familiar with the topography of the country in the formatio
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The honor roll of the University of Virginia, from the times-dispatch, December 3, 1905. (search)
., Col., Tenn., 1864. Brown, S. W., Va., Staunton, Va., 1864. Buckner, T. R., Lt., Va., Spotsylvania, C. H., 1864. Buford, J. W., Va., Gettysburg, Pa., 1864. Buist, E. S., Surg., S. C., Hi2. Coleman, J. H., Maj. Ala., Murfreesboro, Tenn., 1861. Coleman, C. L., Capt., La., Spotsylvania, Va., 1864. Collins, W. G., Va., 186—. Cunrad, H. A., Va., Manassas, Va., 1862. Conradscade, Va., 1862. Hairston, G. S., Miss., Shiloh, Tenn., 1862. Hale, S., Capt., Va., Spotsylvania, Va. Hall, G. A., Lt., Ga., Yorktown, Va., 1862. Hall, R. H., Capt., Va., 1863. Hall, , 1865. Pendleton, A. S., Lt. Col., Va., Woodstock, Va, 1864. Pendleton, P. H., Va., Spotsylvania, Va., 1864. Peyton, R. L. G., Col., Ohio, Golden Springs, O., 1863. Perry, J. E., Ga., Warey, Va., 1861. Watkins, W. M., Va., Halifax, Va., 1864. Watson, D., Maj. Art., Va., Spotsylvania, Va., 1864. Weddell, V. L., Va. Wertenbaker, T. G., Va., Charlottesville, Va., 1862.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Alabama Infantry, Confederate States Army. (search)
. Pickens, of South Carolina, promoted from Adjutant; wounded at Spotsylvania and Winchester. Lieutenant Colonel Theodora O'Hara, of Kentucromoted from Captain, Company C, wounded at Chancellorsville and Spotsylvania. Adjutant S. B. Pickens of South Carolina. Adjutant L. Gayle Corporal Alexander Porter, at Boonsboro. James Kearns, at Spotsylvania, May 11, 1864. Thomas Bennett, in skirmish near Richmond, Junharpsburg. Louis Dendarro, at Wilderness. A. Brickhart, at Spotsylvania. Ben Hammond, at Sharpsburg. S. Stansell, at the Wildernes Gettysburg. John Camuy, at Boonsboro. William Muldoon, at Spotsylvania. The following parties connected with this fine company shoull and J. A. Mikles, at Boonsboro, Md. Captain John Rogers, at Spotsylvania, C. H., Va. Jos. Singleton, at Petersburg, Va. Noah Smith,Seven Pines. J. Hamilton, at Boonsboro. F. M. Hamilton, at Spotsylvania. Lud Hall, at Boonsboro. Wm. Halbrooks, at Gaines Mill.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
thouse that the distinct points of the address may be clearly brought forth, without confusion or mixing with those of other dates. After the battles of the Wilderness, the army of the Potomac, under General Grant, moved to the left towards Spotsylvania. The army of Northern Virginia, under General Lee, also moved and confronted the Northern army, and, on the 8th of May, had an engagement with it near Spotsylvania Courthouse. On the 10th of May portions of the Confederate lines were attacke Hancock, page 361 of Records, says: May 17th, 1864, 8 A. M., Tyler's division, about 8,000 strong, mostly heavy artillery joined the Second corps, which will reinforce us sufficiently to make up our losses at the Wilderness, the Po, and Spotsylvania. The division massed near the Fredericksburg road. No movement of the Second corps until dark, when we marched back to the works we had captured on the 12th instant, at which point it is determined again to assault the enemy to-morrow morn
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
Major-General Johnson at Spotsylvania. From the times-dispatch, November 26, 1905. The Confederate General who met bayonets of enemy with a cane. Wonderful fighting then. Graphic story of the Spotsylvania fight told by Major Robert Hun wondrous story of the Army of Northern Virginia. Enclosed is an account taken from his lips of the Bloody Angle of Spotsylvania, on the 12th of May. It is a finality on the question which sometimes has been raised by the uninformed with respect in Watkins Leigh, his predecessor, was killed. Gallantly did he serve throughout the war, and on that terrific day at Spotsylvania, which he graphically recounts, Major-General Edward Johnson (Old Alleghany, as the soldiers called him, on account of of which were small, were consolidated under General Harry T. Hays. He was wounded on May 10th, and they were now at Spotsylvania, under Colonel Zebulon York. R. D. Johnson's North Carolina brigade had been assigned to Early's division, and on M
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
ents on the left of the turnpike. At one time during the battle I saw an officer being carried off the field, and was told it was Major Daniel, of Early's division. Double quick and double canister on May 10, 1864, we marched from there to Spotsylvania. Arrived there, according to my recollection, the morning of the 10th of May. My battery belonged to Colonel Cutshaw, and was in the rear that day. The Colonel ordered me to remain where I was, as there was no room on the line for me, and ste right of the Bloody Angle, the enemy charged us with their lines of battle, but we poured into them such a destructive fire of shot and shell that they were forced to retire with heavy loss, and gave up the fight. This ended the fighting at Spotsylvania. I have never heard of but one opinion expressed—that if our artillery had been in position on General Edward Johnson's line, the enemy would never have been able to break through, but would have been hurled back with heavy loss. It was a