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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of Beverly ford. (search)
uracy of Major McClellan's spirited account of these, and it is confirmed from various other trustworthy sources. Before reaching Brandy Station, Colonel Duffie had turned to his left, hoping to accomplish something in the enemy's rear. Near Stevensburg he encountered a force of cavalry, which was charged — the First Massachusetts and Third Pennsylvania Cavalry in advance-and driven through and beyond Stevensburg in disorder, as Major McClellan himself avows, with all possible candor. Here CStevensburg in disorder, as Major McClellan himself avows, with all possible candor. Here Colonel Duffie paused, distrusting, no doubt, his isolation from the main body of the Kelly's ford column. General Gregg had advanced directly upon Brandy Station without opposition, and thence to the Fleetwood hill, where Stuart made hasty preparations to receive him. Fleetwood hill is a ridge of ground, half a mile from Brandy Station, toward the Rappahannock, and west of the railroad. St. James' Church is on the river side of the hill, and Buford was now working his way up to it from that s
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Union cavalry at Gettysburg. (search)
ld by a large number of field-pieces supported by troops. General Gregg, with his own and Colonel Dufie's command, crossed at the same time at Kelly's Ford. Agreeably to orders from the corps commander, Colonel Dufie proceeded at once to Stevensburg to take position, while Gregg marched directly upon Brandy Station, which, owing to the number of miles to be marched and obstructions met in the roads, he did not reach until some hours after Buford's attack had been made. Upon an open plainld whose glories have not often been surpassed. Moving on a short interior line, the mass of the rebel mounted force was speedily concentrated at the point of danger, so as to give it largely the preponderance in numbers. Dufie's command, at Stevensburg, having encountered there some of the enemy, could not be gotten on the field in time to take part in the engagement; still the contest was maintained until the arrival of rebel infantry from Culpepper; after this a junction was made by the tw
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of fleet Wood. (search)
tion; but learning from Robertson that a column of the enemy was moving upon Stevensburg, this regiment, the Second South Carolina, Colonel M. C. Butler, was orderedranspiring near Brandy Station, affairs wore a far different complexion near Stevensburg, to which point Colonel M. C. Butler's Second South Carolina, and Colonel W.e enemy's charge without firing a gun. They were pursued through the town of Stevensburg, and for some distance beyond, nor could the men be rallied until satisfied dy Station, the Yankees being in my rear. I had reported their advance upon Stevensburg and Brandy, and was ordered, through Lieutenant Johnston, to hold the groundton with the information. Soon afterward the enemy was reported moving upon Stevensburg, in large force. I ordered Lieutenant Holcombe to report the fact to the Major General commanding, who informed me that a force had been sent to Stevensburg, and that troops were at Brandy Station. Before receiving this message, I had cont
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
ght which ensued, the Black Horse lost some of its bravest men, and the Fourth Virginia two of its most gallant officers. This spirited attack, combined with an attack by General Lomax's Brigade, compelled Buford's retreat to the direction of Stevensburg, closely pursued by Lomax. Captain Randolph, in command of the Black Horse, with some other men from the regiment, arrived at Stevensburg as the Third Virginia Cavalry had been repulsed. Being in line of battle he charged the Federals with Stevensburg as the Third Virginia Cavalry had been repulsed. Being in line of battle he charged the Federals with great spirit, and drove them back on their dismounted line. Captain Randolph then ordered his men to fall back a few hundred yards in an open field, and there rallied them around their colors, under a heavy fire of the enemy. By this gallant conduct a large number of the Third Virginia, with their lieutenant colonel, were rescued. For this service General Fitz Lee complimented Captain Randolph in high terms, and said it was the most beautiful sight he had ever witnessed. This commendation w