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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 120 24 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 110 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 68 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 66 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 53 1 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 26 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 16 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee. You can also browse the collection for Twymans Mill (Virginia, United States) or search for Twymans Mill (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 7: Atlantic coast defenses.-assigned to duty in Richmond as commander in chief under the direction of the Southern President. (search)
e Third Corps, under Heintzelman, followed. The Chickahominy now divided McClellan's army into two parts. Two of his corps were on the south, and three-Sumner's, Franklin's, and Porter's — on the north side, McClellan's headquarters being at Gaines Mill. The Chickahominy River rises some twelve miles northwest of Richmond, flows in an easterly direction at first, and then takes a southeasterly course, till it empties into the James, some thirty miles below Richmond. It was directly interpoot more than four or five miles from the city, and the numerous roads leading out from Richmond to the Peninsula and adjacent sections of country cross it on bridges. North of Richmond was Meadow Bridge; a little farther down, and opposite to Gaines Mill, New Bridge; still farther down, where the Williamsburg road crosses the Chickahominy, Bottom's Bridge; while lower down still is Long Bridge. McClellan spent two weeks in traversing the forty miles from Williamsburg to the Chickahominy a
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 8: commands the army defending Richmond, and seven days battles. (search)
on of his line. On the left was Sumner, and to his left Heintzelman extended as far as the White Oak swamp. In their rear Keyes was in reserve. On the north or left bank of the Chickahominy Fitz John Porter's corps was still stationed, near Gaines Mill, with McCall's division of Pennsylvania reserves at Mechanicsville and on Beaver Dam Creek-eleven divisions in all. Richmond, Mc-Clellan's coveted prize, was but five miles away. To reach it he had to pass over the lines of the Army of Northeserious work, and begged the Secretary that he would put some one general in command of the Shenandoah Valley and of all troops in front of Washington for the sake of the country. On the same day he complimented Porter for his fine efforts at Gaines Mill, says he looks upon the day as decisive of the war, and tells him to try and drive the rascals, and take some prisoners and guns. This was an hour or two before Porter's defeat. General Hooker did not seem to be so confident, for about the s
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
. Fort Fisher, fall of, 368. Fort Hamilton, 30. Fort Henry captured, 131. Fort Monroe, 75, 135, 137, 308. Fort Moultrie, 87. Fort Sumter, 86, 87, 101. Fourth United States Infantry, 327. Foy, General, quoted, 56. Forrest, General N. B., 24. Franklin, General William B., mentioned, 138, 140, 194, 196, 206, 226, 228. Fredericksburg, battle of 222. Fremont, General John 6., 143, 179. French, General, mentioned, 230. Fry, Colonel D. B., at Fredericksburg, 296. Gaines Mill, battle of, 145, 169. Garland, General, killed, 207. Garnett, General, mentioned, 207, 294, 296; killed at Gettysburg, 294. Garnett, Robert S., mentioned, 102, 113. General Orders No. 1, Lee's, 368. George . mentioned, 79. Germania Ford, 243. Gettysburg, battle of, 142, 270; losses in, 302. Gettysburg and Vicksburg, 309; removal of dead, 409; compared with Waterloo, 421. Gibbons, General, 244. Gloucester Point, Va., 136. Gooch, Sir, William, mentioned, 5. G