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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 71 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 70 4 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 66 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 52 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 48 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 44 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for West Point (Virginia, United States) or search for West Point (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 2 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
twelve miles further up. Commander T. H. Patterson, in the Chocura, proceeded up the river as far as Lieutenant-Commander (now Rear-Admiral) T. S. Phelps. West Point, which had been deserted by the enemy. White flags were flying all along the river. A few small vessels were captured, but the enemy had fled from that quarte to remedy the evil. When General McClellan had captured Yorktown he almost immediately moved part of his army up the river in transports in the direction of West Point. On the 7th of May, 1862, Lieutenant T. H. Stevens reported that, hearing the firing of heavy cannon, he proceeded on board the Lieutenant Leonard Paulding the river became so narrow and crooked that they could go no farther, and in returning had to drop stern foremost. General Franklin's object in advancing on West Point was to cut off the retreat of the Confederates from Yorktown. But he encountered a much larger force than he had expected, and but for the gun-boats would have
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
conduct of Navy. Lieutenant French's expedition. important captures. General Dix evacuates West Point, covered by gun-boats. expeditions up North, York, and Mattapony Rivers. cutting out of Confhe duty was performed very thoroughly. On May 31st, 1863, General Dix concluded to evacuate West Point, at the head of York River, and on that day the Federal Army marched out, covered by the gun-be mail-boats (the Swan) was fired upon by a party of Confederate raiders, on York River, below West Point, the result of which was the burning by the gun-boat Morse of twelve houses, in front or behinthe transport Winnissimmet. These vessels proceeded to Walkertown, about twenty miles above West Point, on the Mattapony River. Here the troops were landed and marched to Aylett's, where the objectary movements on the Peninsula, have constant accounts of the Federal's getting possession of West Point and then evacuating it, to fall back on Yorktown, which latter place seems to have been kept f