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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 71 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 70 4 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 66 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 52 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 48 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 44 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for West Point (Virginia, United States) or search for West Point (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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ving returned all the wagons and teams, and public property of every description intrusted to them, safely to camp. Joseph B. Rodden, Company K, Sixteenth regiment, remained on the field at Centreville until the morning after the battle, and brought into camp, with the aid of a negro, whom he pressed into the service, thirty head of cattle belonging to the Government, and arrived at Alexandria on Tuesday morning. I understand from a deserter, now in my camp, that my old class-mate at West Point, Robert E. Lee, commanded the enemy's forces opposed to me at Blackburn's Ford. I am, sir, very respectfully, your ob't serv't, Thos. A. Davies, Col. Comd'g 2d Brigade, Fifth Division, Army N. E. Virginia. T. H. Cowdrey, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. Major Barnard's report. Washington,, July 29, 1861. Capt. E. B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General: sir: On the 18th of July, at about 9 A. M., I joined the commanding general about two miles beyond Fairfax Court House, on t
ed yards' distance. There was a constant struggle during the day over the enemy's batteries. Time and again were they captured by our men, and very often retaken by the enemy. The most excited creature on the battle field was the Rev. Mr. Repetto, Captain of the Page Co. (Va.) Grays, who claimed the honor of taking Rickett's (Sherman's) battery. Of his whole company, nearly one hundred strong, he had only eighteen uninjured. Another of our reverends, Colonel Pendleton, a graduate of West Point, a resident of Lexington, Virginia, and an Episcopalian minister, was quite busy during the day, and doubtless did more than any one else to check the advancing enemy. The inquiry among the prisoners was very general, Who commanded that battery on the left that killed so many of our men? Our reply was that it was a saint named Pendleton. About 5 o'clock our anxious minds were relieved by the cessation of cannonading from their side, whilst upon ours the thunders still rolled out long
ho knew him, to have retained their natural expression wonderfully. He was instantly recognized by Major Love, Gen. Morris, and Capt. Bentram, all of whom were intimately acquainted with him. Major Love had been for four years his room-mate at West Point, and had always cherished a warm friendship for him till he turned traitor to the flag and to the Government which had educated and made him what he was. Returning from the bank where Garnett lay, I went up to the bluff on which the enemy hawhere a metallic coffin could be procured, and the remains preserved subject to the order of his friends. General Garnett was a cousin of the noted ex-Congressman, and was purely a military character by choice and education. He graduated at West Point in 1841, at the same time with one of General Morris's staff, who was for a time his room-mate. He distinguished himself in the Mexican war, and has since held important positions in the service of the Government and his native State. He chos