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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 71 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 70 4 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 66 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 52 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 48 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 44 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for West Point (Virginia, United States) or search for West Point (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
And first, that I should ever have been invited to be next his person at all, was characteristic of Jackson. He, who was an alumnus of the military academy at West Point, and nothing but a professional military man all his life, was least bound in professional trammels. This trait he signified, in part, by his selection of successive chiefs for his staff, none of whom had even snuffed the classical air of West Point or Lexington, my intended predecessor and actual successor (J. A. Armstrong and C. J. Faulkner), and the next successor (A. S. Pendleton), but chiefly by the selection of me, a man of peace, and soldier of the Prince of Peace, innocent, evenorses, or roaming through the magnificent park, which contains over three hundred deer. General Jackson and General Lee were room-mates and intimate friends at West Point; but entering different regiments of the old army, and serving in different departments of the Confederacy, they had not met since they parted soon after gradua
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
the eye-witness, the humble Ego must needs speak in the egotistical first person. And first, that I should ever have been invited to be next his person at all, was characteristic of Jackson. He, who was an alumnus of the military academy at West Point, and nothing but a professional military man all his life, was least bound in professional trammels. This trait he signified, in part, by his selection of successive chiefs for his staff, none of whom had even snuffed the classical air of WestWest Point or Lexington, my intended predecessor and actual successor (J. A. Armstrong and C. J. Faulkner), and the next successor (A. S. Pendleton), but chiefly by the selection of me, a man of peace, and soldier of the Prince of Peace, innocent, even in youth, of any tincture of military knowledge. Herein was indeed a strange thing; that I, the parson, tied to him by no blood tie, or interest, and by acquaintanceship only slightest and most transient; that I, at home nursing myself into partial c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ects to the General. The next day we had a charming day at Belle Meade, the splendid estate of General Hardin, where his sons-in-law, General Wm. H. Jackson and United States Senator Howell E. Jackson, and their accomplished ladies, did the honors with unsurpassed grace, and where we could have spent days inspecting the blooded horses, or roaming through the magnificent park, which contains over three hundred deer. General Jackson and General Lee were room-mates and intimate friends at West Point; but entering different regiments of the old army, and serving in different departments of the Confederacy, they had not met since they parted soon after graduation, until this visit of General Lee to Nashville. It was pleasant to witness their cordial greeting, and the enthusiastic renewal of their friendship. That night we were treated to a fine concert and superb banquet, at which there were some fine speeches; but our printers have called an imperative halt. Nor can I now speak
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
tory, and of the dead languages, the Latin and the Greek, and the tastes thus early stimulated had been preserved and cultivated in after years. As a cadet at West Point he graduated second in a distinguished class, excellence of conduct and excellence of attainment going hand in hand. Appointed an officer of Engineers when he siduous study and research. Still later, after he returned with great distinction from Mexico, he became the Superintendent and Head of the Military Academy at West Point, and occupying that position for three years, he acquired experience and developed capacities which singularly fitted him for the sphere which he now entered,—the training of youth. It is indicative of his comprehensive views of education, that during his superintendency at West Point, the course of study was extended to five years and greatly enlarged in its scope. And when he entered upon his duties here, it was soon evident that he possessed every qualification to direct with signal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The friendship between Lee and Scott. (search)
The friendship between Lee and Scott. By J. Wm. Jones. Now that the bitter memories of the late war between the States are passing away, and those who were enemies once can meet as friends and brothers again, it is very pleasant to recall the fact that even amid the animosities of war there were instances of warm friendship existing between soldiers of the opposing armies. That playful correspondence between Jeb Stuart and his old West Point chum at Lewinsville, in 1861, the capture of his old classmate by Fitz. Lee in 1862, and the jolly time they had together as they sang Benny Havens O! and revived memories of Auld Lang Syne—the meeting between Major Bob Wheat and Colonel Percy Wyndham, when the latter was captured by Ashby near Harrisonburg, Va., in 1862, and many similar incidents, might be given to show that there were friendships which could not be broken by the fact that honest men took opposite sides in the war. But one of the most conspicuous illustrations is the wa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee and Scott. (search)
eneral Scott—If the same language should best express the same idea, why should I not? But what do you mean? Governor Anderson—I will swear, that when in 1854 I asked you about the qualifications of Major Robert E. Lee for Superintendent of West Point you used identically the same words that you have now used—viz., that of his grade, Lee was the first soldier in Christendom. Well, said General Scott, I believed it then as I do now, and think it very likely that I did use the same languagedent Davis upon the subject, and urged him by every consideration which I could think of to comply with the President's wishes as to the recommendation. General Custis Lee was recognized as one of the most distinguished graduates sent out from West Point, and a man of high attainments, great ability, and with a character very much resembling that of his distinguished father. But I could make no impression upon the General, and the only answer which I could get from him, and which he reiterated<