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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 71 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 70 4 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 66 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 52 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 48 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 44 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 17, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for West Point (Virginia, United States) or search for West Point (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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The Peninsula. A report was brought by the York River train, yesterday afternoon, that heavy firing was heard in the morning, by persons at West Point, and the inference was that a fight had commenced on the Peninsula. We have heard that General Mansfield lately sent a message to General Magruder, giving him notice to evacuate his position within ten days, and that the latter, in reply, defied him to come out and attempt to drive him away. Until we receive a confirmation of the report circulated yesterday, we shall hesitate to believe that any engagement has yet taken place. According to the latest Federal advices, Mansfield had gone to take command at Hatteras, and Wool had returned to Fortress Monroe. We lean from a private letter that on Sunday last an order from General Magruder was read in the several camps, announcing the receipt of positive information that the enemy had lately landed 70 rifled cannon and 500 artillery horses at Fortress Monroe; that he placed the