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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 28 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 20 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 11 1 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 8 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 8 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 8 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Wytheville (Virginia, United States) or search for Wytheville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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y itself, has acted mostly upon the defensive, in repelling raids and in breaking up guerrilla bands. When Lee's army retreated across the Potomac, in July last, Brigadier-General Kelly concentrated all his available force on the enemy's flank, near Clear Springs, ready to cooperate in the proposed attack by General Meade; they also rendered valuable services in the pursuit after Lee had effected his passage of the river. On the twenty-fourth of July, Colonel Toland attacked the enemy at Wytheville, on the Eastern and Virginia Railroad, capturing two pieces of artillery, seven hundred muskets, and one hundred and twenty-five prisoners. Our loss was seventeen killed and sixty-one wounded; the enemy's killed and wounded reported to be seventy-five. In August, General Averill attacked a rebel force under General Sam Jones, at Rocky Gap, in Green Brier County, capturing one gun, one hundred and fifty prisoners, and killing and wounding some two hundred. Our loss in killed, wounded, a
e ground. The One Hundred and Third Ohio and Sixty-fifth Illinois, sent to reenforce them, finally drove the enemy from the coveted position. Our loss in this affair was sixty killed and wounded. Matters are now assuming an interesting outlook. Old scout Reynolds came in this evening from Kingston, bringing confirmation of Bragg's defeat and the assurance of present aid from Grant. Sherman is said to be at Cleveland, Generals Fry and Willcox at Bean's Station, and considerable force at Wytheville — from all of which, if true, Longstreet's position will not prove to be an easy one. His chief care will now be to effect his escape by the North-Carolina mountains as the only road left open to him. Orders by General Burnside. headquarters army of the Ohio, Knoxville, Tenn., Nov. 25, 1863. General field orders, No. 32. In accordance with the proclamation of the President of the United States, Thursday, the twenty-sixth instant, will, so far as military operations will per