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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 587 133 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 405 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 258 16 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 156 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 153 31 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 139 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 120 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 120 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 119 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 111 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee. You can also browse the collection for Yorktown (Virginia, United States) or search for Yorktown (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 3: a cavalry officer of the army of the United States. (search)
ssible to his regimental headquarters in Texas. The death of the adopted son of Washington, October 10, 1857, in his seventy-sixth year, was greatly deplored. His unbounded hospitality was as broad as his acres, and his vivid recollections of the Father of his Country, though only eighteen when he died, and whose memory he venerated, were most charmingly narrated. His father, John Parke Custis, the son of Mrs. Washington by her first husband, was Washington's aid-de-camp at the siege of Yorktown, and died at the early age of twenty-eight. G. W. P. Custis, the grandson of Mrs. Washington, was educated at Princeton. His early life was passed at Mount Vernon, but after the death of his grandmother, in 1802, he built Arlington House, opposite the city of Washington, on an estate left him by his father. In his will he decreed that all of his slaves should be set free after the expiration of five years. The time of manumission came in 1863, when the flames of war were fiercely ragi
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 5: invasion of Virginia. (search)
on of his commission and his decision to fight under the flag of the South was hailed with delight by the Southern people, who felt they were securing the services of an army commander of undoubted merit. General Benjamin Huger, another distinguished officer of the army of the United States, who had also resigned, was charged with watching over Norfolk. General John Bankhead Magruder, who had acquired distinction in the Federal army but had joined his fortunes to the South, was ordered to Yorktown to defend the peninsular route. General Holmes, who had rendered conspicuous service in the army of the United States, was sent to command at Acquia Creek, some twelve miles east of Fredericksburg. Robert Garnett, also an officer of the United States Army, of-tested ability, was ordered to West Virginia to take charge of the department and of the forces assembling in that region. All of these officers had been selected with great care, and had been more or less distinguished in the arm
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 7: Atlantic coast defenses.-assigned to duty in Richmond as commander in chief under the direction of the Southern President. (search)
ceded him. Magruder was a short distance in his front with eleven thousand men. His left was at Yorktown, on York River, and his line of battle extended along the Warwick River to Mulberry Island, on the James, where his right rested. Gloucester Point, opposite Yorktown, projects well out into the river. Fortifications had been constructed there, and it was expected that the guns at that point as well as those at Yorktown by crossfire could prevent the passage of the Federals up York River in any attempt to reach the Confederate rear. It will be remembered that when the British held YorkYorktown over a century ago they also fortified and held Gloucester Point, and to it, at one time, Cornwallis attempted to retreat when the troops of Washington were closing around him. Magruder's front n arrived in person April 14th, and assumed command on the 17th. His advance did not arrive at Yorktown till the 10th, the other divisions following a few days later. For six days McClellan was in
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 15: evacuation of Richmond and the Petersburg lines.--retreat and surrender. (search)
No man could have behaved better than General Grant did under the circumstances, said Lee to a friend in Richmond. He did not touch my sword; the usual custom is for the sword to be received when tendered, and then handed back, but he did not touch mine. Neither did the Union chief enter the Southern lines to show himself or to parade his victory, or go to Richmond or Petersburg to exult over a fallen people, but mounted his horse and with his staff started for Washington. Washington, at Yorktown, was not as considerate and thoughtful of the feelings of Cornwallis or his men. Charges were now withdrawn from the guns, flags furled, and the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia turned their backs upon each other for the first time in four long, bloody years. The Southern soldiers, wrapped in faded, tattered uniforms, shoeless and weather-beaten, but proud as when they first rushed to battle, returned to desolate fields, homes in some cases in ashes, blight, blast,
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
ion, 10. White House, 164, 167. White Oak Swamp, 153, 162. White, Professor, 281. White, William, of Lexington, 406. Whiting, General W. H. C., 155. Whittier, Colonel, of Humphreys's staff, 391. Wickham family, the, 305. Wigfall, Senator, of Texas, 332. Wilcox's brigade at Gettysburg, 279-297. Wilderness, battles of the, 329. Wilderness tavern, 247, 329. William and Mary College, 33. William the Conqueror, 2, 141, 278. Williams, General, Seth, 262, 389, 390. Windsor Forest estate, 18. Windsor, General, Charles, 180. Wirtz, Captain, trial of, 407. Wise, General Henry A., 76, xno, 113, 117, 118, 119, 123, 347. Withers, John, 150. Wolsey, Cardinal, mentioned, 65. Wool, General John E., 34, 35. Worth, General William J., 400. Wright, General H. G., succeeds Sedgwick, 334. Yellow Tavern, battle of, 337. Yorktown, 136. Young Napoleon, 114. Ziegler's Grove at Gettysburg, 296. Zook, General, killed at Gettysburg, 302. The End.