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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 587 133 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 405 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 258 16 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 156 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 153 31 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 139 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 120 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 120 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 119 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 111 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Yorktown (Virginia, United States) or search for Yorktown (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
en to Washington or Baltimore in her normal condition; (6) that she could not have gone to sea at all; (7) that, although she could have run by the Federal fleet and Old Point (barring torpedoes in the channel) and threatened McClellan's base at Yorktown, in exceptionably good weather, yet would have had to leave the James river open. VII. For the truth of the very important facts mentioned in sections I, II and III, I am willing to abide by the log-book of the Monitor, the dispatches of Flanter in huts on the banks of Bull Run. Meanwhile the fifth company had sprung into existence in New Orleans, and at Shiloh the praise and admiration of the whole South was theirs for gallant fighting. Their guns were heard, too, at Monterey, Yorktown, Farmington and Corinth. And our batteries in Virginia were not idle, as Mechanicsville, Seven Pines, Gaines's Mill, Savage Station, Frazier's Farm, and Malvern Hill, will attest. Leaving McClellan upon the James, after his famous change o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and Monitor. (search)
save on the occasion above referred to; (4) that the Merrimac, so far from being seriously injured in her engagement, efficiently protected the approaches to Norfolk and Richmond until Norfolk was evacuated; (5) that the Merrimac could not have gotten to Washington or Baltimore in her normal condition; (6) that she could not have gone to sea at all; (7) that, although she could have run by the Federal fleet and Old Point (barring torpedoes in the channel) and threatened McClellan's base at Yorktown, in exceptionably good weather, yet would have had to leave the James river open. VII. For the truth of the very important facts mentioned in sections I, II and III, I am willing to abide by the log-book of the Monitor, the dispatches of Flag officer Goldsborough, or the testimony of Commander Dana Greene, United States Navy, who was the gallant and efficient executive officer of the Monitor from the day she left New York until she foundered off Cape Hatteras. VIII. In conclusion I
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
, are perhaps enjoyed more now in retrospection than was the reality at the time. The second company, under Rosser and Slocomb, had also won their spurs at Munson's Hill and Lewinsville, under the dashing J. E. B. Stuart; and then came the long winter in huts on the banks of Bull Run. Meanwhile the fifth company had sprung into existence in New Orleans, and at Shiloh the praise and admiration of the whole South was theirs for gallant fighting. Their guns were heard, too, at Monterey, Yorktown, Farmington and Corinth. And our batteries in Virginia were not idle, as Mechanicsville, Seven Pines, Gaines's Mill, Savage Station, Frazier's Farm, and Malvern Hill, will attest. Leaving McClellan upon the James, after his famous change of base, the battalion marched with General Lee's army, and at Rappahannock Station engaged the batteries of General Pope, and then moved forward through Thoroughfare Gap. Manassas's great battle, of two days duration, followed, resulting in the defe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
olls of English and American history, from the conquest of the Norman at Hastings, to the triumph of the Continentals at Yorktown,—he had already established his own martial fame at Vera Cruz, Cerro Gordo, Contreras, Cherubusco, Molino del Rey, Chepuin the progress of events, Johnston had exhibited again his strategic skill in holding Mc-Clellan at bay on the lines of Yorktown, with a force so small that it seemed hardihood to oppose him with it—had eluded his toils by a retreat up the Peninsulaolonial Capitol of Williamsburg on May 5th, 1862, and had planted his army firmly around Richmond. Pending the siege of Yorktown, a thing had happened that probably had no parallel in history. The great body of General Johnston's army had reorganiz example of this. At one time he fought against the French under Braddock; at another time he fought with the French at Yorktown, under the orders of the Continental Congress of America, against him. He has not been branded by the world with reproac
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee and Scott. (search)
ville, Ky.: I have read what you propose to say at the meeting of Morgan's command, about to take place in Lexington, Ky., concerning the statements of Colonel Thomas L. Alexander, as to the interview between General Scott and the then Colonel Robert E. Lee. Colonel Alexander was one of my most intimate friends, and as reliable a man as I ever knew. In 1862—the exact time I do not remember, but it was before the advance of McClellan's army from Washington towards Richmond by the way of Yorktown—Colonel Alexander made statements to me substantially the same as those which you represent him as having made to you at a subsequent time. During the same conversation, or about that time, Colonel Alexander gave me an account of the toast offered by General Scott to the then Captain Lee, at the banquet in the city of Mexico, of which I believe you have given an exactly correct statement. Joshua F. Bullitt. Letter from Governor Anderson. Nuttawa, Ky., July 20, 1883. Thomas W.