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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 16 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 14 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A.. You can also browse the collection for Bunker Hill (West Virginia, United States) or search for Bunker Hill (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 7 document sections:

Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 17: preparations about Fredericksburg. (search)
ved across the Opequon to the Williamsport pike, and on the next day to the vicinity of Martinsburg. On the 27th, General Jackson's whole command was moved to Bunker Hill on the road from Martinsburg to Winchester, and went into camp in that vicinity. By this time our baggage wagons, which had been sent from Manassas to the vallnow able to obtain supplies of flour, by threshing wheat, of which there was a good supply in the valley, and having it ground. While our camps were located at Bunker Hill, Jackson's command destroyed the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad from North Mountain to within five miles of Harper's Ferry, which latter place had been re-occupied bHill, A. P. Hill, and Jackson (EWell's division being under my command and Jackson's under J. R. Jones). For some time the second corps remained camped near Bunker Hill, and the first corps was camped in the vicinity of Winchester. McClellan in the meantime had concentrated the main body of his army on the north bank of th
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 25: retreat to Virginia. (search)
d it in front. We moved that night to the foot of the mountain at Guardstown, and crossing early next morning (the 21st) through Mills' Gap, marched down Back Creek to the rear of Hedgesville, where we found that the force had made its escape by retiring the night before. The division was then moved across the mountain through Hedgesville and camped. During the night I received orders to move up the valley for the purpose of crossing the Blue Ridge, and next day (the 22nd) I marched to Bunker Hill. On the 23rd I passed through Winchester to the Opequon on the Front Royal road, being joined that day by the 13th Virginia Regiment. General Ewell, who had preceded me with Rodes' and Johnson's divisions, had that day been engaged with a heavy force which came through Manassas Gap, which he moved out to meet, near the Gap, as he was moving past Front Royal, and he sent at night to inform me that he would retire up the Luray Valley for the purpose of crossing at Thornton's Gap, and to
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 42: battle of Kernstown. (search)
etic cavalry commander. I think, if I had had one on this occasion, the greater part of the enemy's force would have been captured or destroyed, for the rout was thorough. Our loss, in this action, was very light. The enemy's loss in killed and wounded was severe, and two or three hundred prisoners fell into our hands; and among them, Colonel Mulligan, in command of a division, mortally wounded. The infantry was too much exhausted to continue the pursuit on the 25th, and only moved to Bunker Hill, twelve miles from Winchester. The pursuit was continued by our cavalry, and the enemy's rear guard of cavalry was encountered at Martinsburg; but after slight skirmishing, it evacuated the place. The whole defeated force crossed the Potomac, and took refuge at Maryland Heights and Harper's Ferry. The road from Winchester, via Martinsburg, to Williamsport was strewed with debris of the rapid retreat-twelve caissons and seventy-two wagons having been abandoned, and most of them burned.
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 43: the burning of Chambersburg. (search)
f cars loaded with supplies. One of Rodes' brigades was crossed over at Williamsport and subsequently withdrawn. On the 30th, McCausland being well under way I moved back to Martinsburg, and on the 31st, the whole infantry force was moved to Bunker Hill, where we remained on the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd of August. On the 4th, in order to enable McCausland to retire from Pennsylvania and Maryland, and to keep Hunter, who had been reinforced by the 6th and 19th corps, and had been oscillating betwnoitre, which, after skirmishing with Jackson's cavalry, was driven off by the sharpshooters of Gordon's division. On the 6th, the whole force recrossed the Potomac at Williamsport, and moved towards Martinsburg, and on the 7th we returned to Bunker Hill. While at Sharpsburg on this occasion, I rode over the ground on which the battle of Sharpsburg or Antietam, as it is called by the enemy, was fought, and I was surprised to see how few traces of that great battle remained. In the woods at
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 44: retreat to Fisher's Hill. (search)
m Grant's army. On the 10th, we moved from Bunker Hill to the east of Winchester, to cover the roage. On the 19th, my main force moved to Bunker Hill and Lomax's cavalry made reconnaissances tomoved to Leetown, on the 27th moved back to Bunker Hill; while Anderson, who had confronted Sherida 1st, but on the 2nd, I broke up my camp at Bunker Hill, and moved with three divisions of infantryand the Opequon, but Rodes returned towards Bunker Hill and drove the enemy back in turn. This affhed my camp. On the 3rd, Rodes moved to Bunker Hill in support of Lomax's cavalry, and drove tht it. On the 10th, my infantry moved by Bunker Hill to Darksville and encountered a considerablrg across the Opequon. We then returned to Bunker Hill and the next day to Stephenson's depot, andon's divisions, and Braxton's artillery, to Bunker Hill, and on the morning of the 18th with Gordonion of Charlestown, and we then returned to Bunker Hill. Gordon was left at Bunker Hill, with orde[1 more...]
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 45: battle of Winchester. (search)
Chapter 45: battle of Winchester. At light on the morning of the 19th, our cavalry pickets, at the crossing of the Opequon on the Berryville road, were driven in, and information having been sent me of that fact, I immediately ordered all the troops at Stephenson's depot to be in readiness to move, directions being given for Gordon, who had arrived from Bunker Hill, to move at once, but by some mistake on the part of my staff officer, the latter order was not delivered to General Breckenridge or Gordon. I rode at once to Ramseur's position, and found his troops in line across the Berryville road skirmishing with the enemy. Before reaching this point, I had ascertained that Gordon was not moving and sent back for him, and now discovering that the enemy's advance was a real one and in heavy force, I sent orders for Breckenridge and Rodes to move up as rapidly as possible. The position occupied by Ramseur was about one mile and a half out from Winchester, on an elevated plateau
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
F., 97, 99, 108, 110 Brownsburg, 328 Brown's Gap, 371, 433, 434 Brucetown, 413 Buchanan, 327, 329, 330, 369, 375, 377, 380 Buckner's Neck, 160 Buffalo, 328 Buffalo Gap, 326, 327 Buford, Colonel, 278 Buford, General (U. S. A.), 266 Buford's Depot, 377 Buford's Gap, 377 Bull Mountain, 114 Bull Pasture River, 326 Bull Run, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 16, 17, 18, 19, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 33, 37, 39, 44, 45, 46, 47, 52, 53, 54, 55, 58, 118, 119, 127, 128, 129, 306 Bunker Hill, 163, 284, 400, 402, 403, 406, 408, 410, 411, 413, 419, 420 Burke's Station, 50 Burnside, General (U. S. A.), 104, 1.05, 106, 131, 132, 150, 151, 158, 165, 166, 169, 180, 189, 192, 341, 343, 348, 356, 358, 477 Burton's Mill, 242 Butler, General (U. S. A.), 40, 341, 344, 364 Butterfield (U. S. A.), 218 Cabell, General, 198, 210 Calf Pasture River, 326 Callahan's, 327, 330 Callaway, Lieutenant, Wm. G., 187, 209, 250, 464 Camden, 184 Cameron's Depot, 408 Cam