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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 50 2 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 35 21 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 34 0 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 33 9 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 25 3 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 1 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 18 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A.. You can also browse the collection for Charles Town (West Virginia, United States) or search for Charles Town (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 15: movement into Maryland. (search)
re & Ohio Railroad, some miles west of Martinsburg, near which they bivouacked. On the morning of the 12th we moved for Martinsburg, and found that a force of the enemy at that place under General White had retired in the direction of Harper's Ferry on the approach of Hill's division. We passed through the town in the direction of Harper's Ferry and Ewell's division bivouacked on the banks of the Opequon. On the morning of the 13th we resumed the march, and reached the turnpike from Charlestown to Harper's Ferry, one mile above Halltown, and bivouacked in sight of the enemy's work on Bolivar Heights, covering the town at the ferry, to wait until McLaws and Walker should get in position on Maryland Heights and Loudon Heights respectively, both of which overlooked and commanded the enemy's position. On the afternoon of the 14th, McLaws and Walker having previously gotten in position and opened fire with their artillery, General Jackson's force moved forward to invest the enemy
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 17: preparations about Fredericksburg. (search)
the east side of the Blue Ridge, with a view to another approach to Richmond. His army had been largely recruited, and superbly equipped. The army of General Lee had been considerably increased by the return of stragglers and convalescents, but it continued to be indifferently supplied with clothing and shoes, of which articles there was a great deficiency. As soon as McClellan's movement was ascertained, Jackson's corps was moved towards the Shenandoah, occupying positions between Charlestown and Berryville, and one division of Longstreet's corps was sent across the Blue Ridge to watch the enemy. When the enemy began to move eastwardly from the mountain, the whole of Longstreet's corps moved across the ridge for the purpose of intercepting his march. D. H. Hill's division of Jackson's corps was subsequently moved across the ridge to watch the enemy's movements. A. P. Hill's division had been put in position near Berryville, covering the Shenandoah, at Snicker's or Castleman
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 36: campaign in Maryland and Virginia. (search)
son; Cedar Creek between Strasburg and Middletown; and the Opequon at Bartonsville, four or five miles from Winchester. There is also another road west of the Valley Pike connecting these several villages called the Back road, and in some places, another road between the Valley Pike and the Back Road, which is called the Middle road. From Winchester there is a macadamized road via Martinsburg, to Williamsport on the Potomac in Maryland, and another via Berryville in Clarke County, and Charlestown in Jefferson County, to Harper's Ferry. There is also a good pike from Winchester to Front Royal, which crosses both forks of the Shenandoah just above their junction; and from Front Royal there are good roads up the Luray Valley, and by the way of Conrad's Store and Port Republic, to Harrisonburg and Staunton. From Staunton, south, there are good roads passing through Lexington, in Rockbridge County, and Buchanan, in Botetourt County, to several points on the Virginia & Tennessee Ra
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 44: retreat to Fisher's Hill. (search)
east of Winchester, to cover the roads from Charlestown and Berryville to that place; and Ramseur'sy command moving through Smithfield towards Charlestown, and Anderson's on the direct road by Summiear Cameron's depot, about three miles from Charlestown, in a position which he commenced fortifyinis rear guard of cavalry was driven through Charlestown towards Halltown, where Sheridan had taken ry, which had been left holding a line from Charlestown to Shepherdstown, was compelled to retire aursued the enemy through Smithfield towards Charlestown. Quiet prevailed on the 30th, but on thin rear of Berryville, across the road from Charlestown to that place, and was busily fortifying, wont of Winchester and the other in front of Charlestown; which I have not undertaken to detail, as to wit: the Martinsburg road, the road from Charlestown via Smithfield, the road from the same plactown across the Opequon in the direction of Charlestown, and we then returned to Bunker Hill. Gord[2 more...]
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 45: battle of Winchester. (search)
n between this force and the Valley Pike and Cedar Creek Pike back of the latter; which roads furnished my only means of retreat in the event of disaster. My line did not reach the Front Royal road on the right or the Martinsburg road on the left. When the order was sent for the troops to move from Stephenson's depot, General Breckenridge had moved to the front, with Wharton's division and King's artillery, to meet a cavalry force, which had driven our pickets from the Opequon on the Charlestown road, and that division had become heavily engaged with the enemy, and sustained and repulsed several determined charges of his cavalry, while his own flanks were in great danger from the enemy's main force on the right, and a column of his cavalry moving up the Martinsburg road on the left. After much difficulty, and some hard fighting, General Breckenridge succeeded in extricating his force, and moving up the Martinsburg road to join me, but he did not reach the field until about two o
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
71, 272, 273, 277, 278, 478 Central R. R., 261, 378, 359, 361, 369, 372, 457, 460, 461, 465 Centreville, 4, 5, 6, 7, 27, 31, 33, 35, 44, 50, 51, 52, 119, 122, 128, 129, 133, 304 Chaffin's Bluff, 76, 89 Chamberlain, Lieutenant, 172 Chambersburg, 254, 255, 263, 281, 401, 402, 404, 405, 477 Chambliss, General, 357 Chancellorsville, 167, 193, 197, 200, 201, 202, 208, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 231, 233, 235, 237, 475 Chantilly, 129 Charles City Court-House, 73 Charlestown, 136, 164, 240, 369, 406, 408, 409, 411, 413, 414, 419, 424 Charlottesville, 340, 341, 371, 372, 378, 393, 401, 435, 458, 464, 465 C. & 0. Canal, 42, 134, 383, 414, 456 Chester Gap, 238, 285, 457 Chickahominy, 76,77,87,89,155,361 Chilton, Colonel R. H., 200, 201 Chinn's House, 23, 25, 28 Chisholm, Colonel, 17, 26 Christie, Captain C. W., 187 Clarke County, 366, 369 Clark's Mountain, 303 Clear Spring, 402 Clifton Forge, 328, 331, 380 Cobb's Brigade, 149