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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 50 2 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 35 21 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 34 0 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 33 9 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 25 3 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 1 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 18 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charles Town (West Virginia, United States) or search for Charles Town (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jackson's Valley campaign of 1862. (search)
. On the 1st of April the strength of Banks' corps, embracing Shields, is given by General McClellan as 23,339, including 3,652 cavalry, excluding 2,100 railroad guards. McClellan's report — Rebellion Record, companion volume I, page 546. If Sedgwick's brigades continued with him in his advance on Winchester, his entire force was over 25,000. Jackson sent his stores, baggage and sick to the rear, but continued to hold his position at Winchester to the last moment. Banks occupied Charlestown on 26th February, but only reached Stephenson's, four miles north of Winchester, on March 7th. Here Jackson drew up his little force in line of battle to meet him, but the Federals withdrew without attacking. The activity of Ashby, and the boldness with which Jackson maintained his position, impressed his adversary with greatly exaggerated notions of his strength. Banks advanced in a cautious and wary manner, refusing to attack, but pushing forward his left wing, so as to threaten Jac
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Bristoe campaign-preliminary report of General R. E. Lee. (search)
by General Stuart nearly to Haymarket and by General Lee to Gainesville. Here the Federal infantry was encountered, and after capturing a number of them during the night, the cavalry slowly retired before their advance on the following day. When the movement of the army from the Rapidan commenced, General Imboden was instructed to advance down the Valley and guard the gaps of the mountains on our left. This duty was well performed by that officer, and on the 18th instant he marched upon Charlestown and succeeded, by a well concerted plan, in surrounding the place and capturing nearly the whole force stationed there, with all their stores and transportation; only a few escaped to Harper's Ferry. The enemy advanced from that place in superior numbers to attack General Imboden, who retired, bringing off his prisoners and captured property — his command suffering very little loss, and inflicting some damage upon the pursuing columns. In the course of these operations two thousand four
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
nsburg. I made disposition accordingly, concentrating cavalry in his front, and early on the 16th moved Fitz. Lee's brigade down the turnpike towards Shepherdstown, supported by Chambliss, who, though quite ill, with that commendable spirit which has always distinguished him, remained at the head of his brigade. Jenkins' brigade was ordered to advance on the road from Martinsburg towards Shepherdstown, so as by this combination to expose one of the enemy's flanks — while Jones, now near Charlestown, was notified of the attack, in order that he might co-operate; no positive orders were sent him, as his precise locality was not known. These dispositions having been arranged, I was about to attack when I received a very urgent message from the Commanding-General to repair at once to his headquarters. I, therefore, committed to Brigadier-General Fitz. Lee the consummation of my plans, and reported at once to the Commanding-General, whom I found at Bunker Hill. Returning in the af
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official diary of First corps, A. N. V., while commanded by Lt.-General R. H. Anderson, from June 1st to October 18, 1864. (search)
August 21 At daylight we move with Kershaw and Cuttshaw by the old Charlestown road for Charlestown. Lomax's cavalry moves from Bunker Hill in the same direction via Leetown; Early's infantry he town, on the Berryville and Winchester pike. Early arrives within two miles and a half of Charlestown and halts for the night. Casualties in all the skirmishes light. August 22 March resumed at daylight for Charlestown. Meet General Early. Latter's troops encamped in front of Charlestown, ours back on the road we came, about two miles and a half from town. August 23 Without chCharlestown, ours back on the road we came, about two miles and a half from town. August 23 Without change. August 24 In the afternoon the enemy makes a slight demonstration with his cavalry on Early. August 25 Kershaw moves at daylight with Cuttshaw to relieve Rodes and Ramseur. Early'srprise. him. As it is about being executed it is abandoned, the enemy having retired towards Charlestown. Early gets up towards Stone chapel and a small body of enemy's cavalry attack his rear.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Jackson's Valley campaign. (search)
looking for your Colonel. The courier came to me, related what had occurred, and begged I would never send him to General Ewell again. I followed Shields for three days. Have in my possession kindly words from General Ewell for services rendered, and en route to join him had an order to go to Richmond and endeavor to get arms for my men. I joined the army at Winchester the night after they arrived after the battle, but continued with them to Martinsburg and Falling Waters, back to Charlestown and Harper's Ferry. 'Twas here General Jackson left us, having heard of the Federals reoccupying Front Royal; and then came our trials. As soon as the enemy found that Jackson had started back up the Valley, their cavalry became very enterprising and bold, and hung closely to our rear, annoying us by day and night. Jackson, the wagon hunter, never gave up one after it came into his possession. If a tire came off a wagon, he would stop the whole train and wait for it to be fixed on, and