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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 37 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 12 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War.. You can also browse the collection for Falling Waters (West Virginia, United States) or search for Falling Waters (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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attack his positionthat his men would have given the Federal troops a reception such as they had given Pickett. The stubborn resolution of the Army of Northern Virginia was thus unbroken-but the game was played for the time. The army was moving back, slow and defiant, to the Potomac. The cavalry protected its flanks and rear, fighting in the passes of South Mountain, and holding obstinately the ridge in front of Boonsboro, while General Lee formed his line to cover the crossing at Falling Waters and Williamsport. Here, near Boonsboro, Stuart did some of his hardest fighting, and successfully held his ground, crowning every knoll with the guns of his horse artillery. When the infantry was in position, the cavalry retired, and took position on the flanks — the two armies faced each other, and a battle seemed imminent-when one morning General Meade discovered that General Lee was on the south bank of the Potomac. It is said that the Federal commander designed attacking Lee th
t upon the other papers in these Outlines, which contain, with the exception of Corporal Shabrach and Blunderbus, events and details of strict historical accuracy. I have never told you, said Longbow, of the curious adventures which I met with in the Valley in 1861, and how I got my fine blood bay, and lost him. I was then a private, but had just been detailed as volunteer aide to Colonel Jackson-he was not General or Stonewall yet-and had reported a few days before the engagement at Falling Waters. I need not inform you of the state of affairs at that time, further than to say that while Beauregard watched the enemy in front of Washington, with his headquarters at Manassas, Johnston held the Valley against Patterson, with his headquarters at Winchester. Well, it was late in June, I think, when intelligence came that General Patterson was about to cross the Potomac at Williamsport, and Colonel Jackson was sent forward with the First Brigade, as it was then called, to support S