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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 6: the campaign in West Virginia. (search)
Loring's purpose to attempt a movement on Reynolds's rear. This officer occupied, with two thousand men, Cheat Mountain pass, through which the Staunton and Parkersburg pike passed, and had three thousand men in Tygart's Valley on the road to Huttonsville, with a reserve at Huttonsville, so he could re-enforce his troops on the Staunton road, or on the Valley Mountain road, as necessary. Loring, with thirtyfive hundred effective troops, was in front of him on the latter, while General H. R. JaHuttonsville, so he could re-enforce his troops on the Staunton road, or on the Valley Mountain road, as necessary. Loring, with thirtyfive hundred effective troops, was in front of him on the latter, while General H. R. Jackson, with twenty-five hundred men, opposed him on the Staunton road. The natural topographical features, supplemented by artificial means, rendered his position very strong on both. General Lee promptly took the offensive by threatening his front, while a column should proceed, if possible, around one of his flanks and assault his rear — a plan similar to that adopted by McClellan at Rich Mountain. The greatest difficulty in a campaign of this description is to discover suitable routes o