Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Inkerman (West Virginia, United States) or search for Inkerman (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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hat ammunition was running out. Directly in the rear of the Montgomery Guards was their leader, Capt. Thos. Rice. The eyes of Captain Rice, from his station on a slight elevation of the slope, moved, here, there, everywhere. Nothing but a great quantity of rock was lying around, broken in fragments of moderate size, as they had been blasted when the railroad was building. Captain Rice drew upon his experience in the Crimea. He recalled that battle with stones, fought in a rock quarry at Inkerman, close to the redan—one of the bulwarks of Sebastopol—which had now come to him like a flash, born of the need. Quick as the thought, Rice picked up a piece of rock and calling out loudly, Boys, do as we did at Sebastopol! hurled the first stone. Ambulance men, being idle just then, gathered stones at the word. The company, the regiment —even other commands of the brigade—followed with more stone, pelting the enemy savagely in their faces, with good aim. Excellent work was done with th
assaults; and two of the guns, with Garnett's brigade, drove the enemy from a ridge to the left of Sharpsburg. Captain Moody, Lieut. J. Sillers, Sergeants Conroy and Price, and Corporals Gaulin and Donoho were mentioned by Colonel Lee. Like Inkerman, in the Crimea, Sharpsburg on the Antietam was emphatically the battle of the privates. Like Inkerman, too, a fatality seemed to follow the field officers. The report of General Hays remarked, The terrible loss among the officers evinces with als Gaulin and Donoho were mentioned by Colonel Lee. Like Inkerman, in the Crimea, Sharpsburg on the Antietam was emphatically the battle of the privates. Like Inkerman, too, a fatality seemed to follow the field officers. The report of General Hays remarked, The terrible loss among the officers evinces with what fidelity they discharged their duties; Colonel Pendleton said, It is a noteworthy fact that not a single field officer in the brigade who was on duty that day escaped untouched.