Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) or search for Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 42 results in 9 document sections:

ffect a junction at Winchester, and also at Martinsburgh, came in at Clear Spring, with a train of t Our march was turned in the direction of Martinsburgh, hoping there to meet with reenforcements —he steam-whistle, heard in the direction of Martinsburgh, strengthened the hope of reinforcements, aontinued with renewed spirit and ardor. At Martinsburgh, the column halted two and a half hours, thl, was making its way in good order towards Martinsburgh. My retreating column suffered serious lThe retreat was continued without a halt to Martinsburgh, a distance of twenty-two miles; was resume in good order, pursued by the enemy beyond Martinsburgh. The baggage-train proceeded as far as thestation and post-office. The operator at Martinsburgh had left the town on the first rumor of a brps moved on, the enemy harassing in vain. Martinsburgh was reached, and Williamsport--thirteen milStill there was nothing like a panic. At Martinsburgh the order was to press on to Williamsport, [2 more...]
Doc. 19.-battle at Port Republic, Va. Report of General Fremont. headquarters Mountain Department, Port Republic, June 9, 12 M., via Martinsburgh, June 12th. To Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: there was no collision with the enemy after dark last night. This morning we renewed the march against him, entering the woods in battle order, his cavalry appearing on our flanks, Gen. Blenker had the left, Gen. Milroy the right, and Gen. Schenck the centre, with a reserve of Gen. Stahl's brigade and Gen. Bayard's. The enemy was found to be in full retreat on Port Republic, and our advance found his rear-guard barely across the river, and the bridge in flames. Our advance came in so suddenly that some of his officers remaining on this side, escaped with the loss of their horses. A cannonading during the forenoon apprised us of an engagement, and I am informed here that Jackson attacked Gen. Shields this morning, and, after a severe engagement, drove him down the river
risoners captured since the affair represent that our troops fought with great valor, and that the losses of the enemy were large. A prisoner, captured near Martinsburgh, who was in the Front Royal army, states that twenty-five men were killed in the charge on the Buckton station. Six companies of cavalry charged upon our troopnemy made a stand, and the fight began about six o'clock A. M.; in two hours we drove him pell-mell, helter-skelter off the field, and through the town towards Martinsburgh. Our loss is very trifling. I think fifty will cover our dead, and one hundred and fifty our wounded. The enemy had, soon after the fight opened, set fired the town to be fired. At all events, some houses were set on fire, but the citizens extinguished it before great damage was done. Banks is now at or beyond Martinsburgh, with our cavalry and some of our men still in pursuit. Our present expedition is a complete success. There are at least one thousand two hundred prisoners a
from Winchester. The next day he was ordered to Martinsburgh, to take command of the forces there. On the twival, with three thousand five hundred men, from Martinsburgh. Col. Miles seized all the flour from the millstroops. Gen. White retreated about this time to Martinsburgh, via Harper's Ferry, leaving a portion of his co On Thursday evening, being obliged to evacuate Martinsburgh, owing to the approach of Stonewall Jackson, theents? Heavy firing is heard in the direction of Martinsburgh and Sandy Hook, indicating the presence of Sigelay morning, and immediately crossed and moved on Martinsburgh, twenty miles above Harper's Ferry, where there the Potomac at Williamsport, take possession of Martinsburgh, and then pass rapidly behind Harper's Ferry, the there. The movement was admirably conducted. Martinsburgh fell, with a capture of one hundred and fifty prssary trains which had been ordered forward from Martinsburgh and Shepherdstown to relieve the necessities of
White entered Harper's Ferry with his force from Winchester. The next day he was ordered to Martinsburgh, to take command of the forces there. On the twelfth of September he again returned to Harpes for three days previous to Gen. White's arrival, with three thousand five hundred men, from Martinsburgh. Col. Miles seized all the flour from the mills and stores in and around Harper's Ferry, to exception of the three months men, were raw troops. Gen. White retreated about this time to Martinsburgh, via Harper's Ferry, leaving a portion of his command here. On Thursday evening, being obliged to evacuate Martinsburgh, owing to the approach of Stonewall Jackson, the remainder of General White's brigade fell back to the Ferry. The fight of Friday, September 12. On the morning of thicClellan, that he does not send us reenforcements? Heavy firing is heard in the direction of Martinsburgh and Sandy Hook, indicating the presence of Sigel and Banks, but why are no reinforcements sen
ning reached the position assigned to them. Gen. Jackson's force reached Williamsport, on the Potomac, on Friday morning, and immediately crossed and moved on Martinsburgh, twenty miles above Harper's Ferry, where there were some three or four thousand of the enemy's forces. On the approach of Gen. Jackson this force fell back aportion of his troops to occupy and hold the Maryland Heights, Gen. Jackson was directed by Gen. Lee to recross the Potomac at Williamsport, take possession of Martinsburgh, and then pass rapidly behind Harper's Ferry, that a capture might be effected of the garrison known to be there. The movement was admirably conducted. MartiMartinsburgh fell, with a capture of one hundred and fifty prisoners and some stores, the most of which were being taken to the Ferry. The investment of Harper's Ferry was effected on Saturday. Sunday morning there was some firing, and it was renewed yesterday morning, and the result was the unconditional surrender of the garrison-
the contest was carried on mainly by artillery, with which both the enemy and ourselves were abundantly supplied. The only difference between the two, if any at all, was in the superiority of their metal and positions, and on our part the lack of sufficient ammunition. Battery after battery was sent to the rear exhausted, and our ordnance wagons, until late in the day, were on the opposite side of the Potomac, blocked up by the long commissary trains which had been ordered forward from Martinsburgh and Shepherdstown to relieve the necessities of the army. As indicated in the former part of this letter, our artillery was posted on the summits of the line of hills which ran from right to left in front of the town. That of the enemy, with one exception, was on the rising ground at the base of the Blue Ridge, and upon the various eminences this side. A single Federal battery was boldly thrown over the stone bridge on the turnpike, nine hundred or a thousand yards in our front, and
picket out of Shepherdstown, and followed the Ninth Virginia cavalry on the Martinsburgh road so rapidly that they fled, leaving one of their dead in the road. Thisnd it was on this road that Lee's brigade was posted; the other passed on to Martinsburgh, and in obedience to my orders I moved on it. Two miles of travel brought memselves saw their absurdity, and stopped firing. I continued my movement to Martinsburgh, and easily drove several squadrons in my front into the town, my advance arf cavalry and one piece of artillery, Hampton's command was soon driven from Martinsburgh, and I leisurely entered the town with this force, and executed all the ordeotion in the present great struggle for national existence. I remained at Martinsburgh until five o'clock in the afternoon, some time after I had finished my busines falling with them. Their horses were not captured. I brought off from Martinsburgh twenty-four citizens anxious to leave, and nine boys belonging to Frederick,
the ground step by step, back to the main body. By the time his artillery reached him, Col. W. F. H. Lee, who was in command of the brigade, was obliged to place it on the west bank of the Opequon, on the flank of the enemy, as he approached Martinsburgh. Gen. Hampton's brigade had retired through Martinsburgh, on the Tuscarora road, when Gen. Stuart arrived and made dispositions to attack. Lee's brigade was advanced immediately, and Hampton's ordered forward. The enemy retired at the appMartinsburgh, on the Tuscarora road, when Gen. Stuart arrived and made dispositions to attack. Lee's brigade was advanced immediately, and Hampton's ordered forward. The enemy retired at the approach of Lee along the Shepherdstown road, and was driven across the Potomac by the cavalry, with a severe loss, and darkness alone prevented it from being a signal victory. His rear was overtaken and put to flight, our cavalry charging in gallant style under a severe fire of artillery, driving squadron after squadron, killing a number, wounding more, and capturing several. He was driven through Shepherdstown, and crossed the river after dark, in no case standing a hand-to-hand conflict, but r