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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Expedition into Maryland-battle of Monocacy and advance on Washington. (search)
int Lookout, when my determination to retire, made his recall necessary. An immense amount of damage has been done the enemy. Our cavalry has brought off a very large number of horses. Over one thousand have been brought off, and $220,000 in money was levied and collected in Hagerstown and Frederick, the assessment against the latter being $200,000, all of which was paid in Federal and Northern money. I shall rest here a day or two, and shall then move to the valley and drive from Martinsburg a body of cavalry which has returned there, and then send the cavalry to destroy effectually the Baltimore and Ohio railroad westward, and also to destroy the coal mines and furnaces around Cumberland, unless I get different orders. I am sorry I did not succeed in capturing Washington and releasing our prisoners at. Point Lookout, but the latter was impracticable after I determined to retire from before Washington. There was intense excitement and alarm in Washington and Baltimore, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, or the boys in gray, as I saw them from Harper's Ferry in 1861 to Appomattox Court-house in 1865. (search)
ired when about to be flanked, bringing off forty-five prisoners and inflicting other loss, with a loss on his part of only two killed and six or eight wounded. General Johnston at once advanced his whole army to Darkesville, six miles from Martinsburg, where we found Jackson awaiting us, and where, for four days, we remained in line of battle, and, with a force of not quite 9,000, threw down the guage to General Patterson, with his upwards of 20,000. I mingled freely among the men here, having old college mates in nearly every command, and I never saw men more anxious to fight — being eager to be led to attack the enemy at Martinsburg when it seemed settled he would not attack us. It was while we were at Darkesville that I first came in personal contact with the afterwards world-renowned Stonewall Jackson, who was then a modest Brigadier-General of two days standing. A col-porteur (a friend of mine) had sent me word that he desired permission to enter our lines to distribute
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Summer campaign of 1863-report of General W. E. Jones. (search)
nty infantry, the only organized men I could see, to guard the boat and stop the crossing. Officers and men appealed to cheerfully took up arms, posting themselves in buildings to resist cavalry attacks. Soon a respectable defence could have been made, and a rash attack would doubtless have been severely punished. Order being restored, the wounded, and wagons with important papers, were allowed to recommence crossing the river. By evening, two regiments of infantry having arrived from Martinsburg, and General Imboden having got in from the direction of Greencastle with his brigade and some twenty-four pieces of artillery, I determined to make my way, with half a dozen men, through the enemy's lines to my command. This was effected with some very narrow escapes, on the night of the 5th and the morning of the 6th. I rejoined my command at Lightersburg and returned with it by way of Smithtown and Covetown and the old Frederick road so as to participate in the attacks on General Kil
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
. The gallant Colonel Ashby had gone off with his cavalry in pursuit of a force in the direction of Romney, and was thus unfortunately absent at this important juncture. It was soon found impossible for our broken down infantry to over-take the fleeing foe, who threw away guns, knapsacks, and everything which could impede their progress, and accordingly we were halted five miles from Winchester. There were immense quantities of stores of every kind captured at both Winchester and Martinsburg, and our fellows revelled in the supplies of every description, which the sutlers had accumulated in Winchester. It was the capture of these immense quantities of medical, ordnance, commisary, and especially quarter-master stores, which originated the soubriquet by which ever afterwards we knew General Banks, as Stonewall Jackson's quarter-master. I remember that at the battle of Slaughter's Mountain when we learned from a prisoner that General Banks was in command of the forces oppos
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Expedition to Hardy and Hampshire. (search)
eded his own in numbers, I resumed my march back without molestation from the enemy, crossing over to Lost river that night and the next day (the 5th) to this valley. A large portion of the cavalry force which appeared at Moorefield went from Martinsburg and Charlestown, a brigade under Colonel Fish having lately been sent to the lower valley. I have been informed that a force of infantry was following the cavalry, but I am not certain of this. I did not think it prudent to leave the trains ing out the cattle, and for this purpose I sent Major Gilmer's and Captain McNeil's commands, under the command of the latter, into the Alleghany mountains, and placed one regiment in Mechanicsville Gap to prevent Averill, whom I expected from Martinsburg, from getting between me and General Early. I then pressed down the creek to its mouth, at which place there was a guard of one company, which I captured, and I destroyed here the railroad bridges across Patterson's creek, the Potomac and can
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations around Winchester in 1863. (search)
t of the Second and Fifth on the right. Advancing at once with the Second and Fifth Regiments through the fields in right of the woods, in which General Stuart's brigade was posted, we crossed the railroad and reached the turnpike without encountering the enemy. The smoke and fog was so dense that we could only see a few steps in front, and when, on reaching the Martinsburg turnpike, I saw a body of men about fifty yards to the west of that road moving by the flank in the direction of Martinsburg, it was with difficulty I could determine whether they were friends or foes, as they made no hostile demonstrations, and refused to say to what brigade they belonged. Being satisfied, at last, that it was a retreating column of the enemy, I ordered the command to fire. The enemy gave way and retreated back from the pike in disorder at the first fire, returning only a straggling and inaccurate fire. Pressing them back rapidly to the woods west of the road, they made no stand, but hois
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of the First Maryland regiment. (search)
Colonel Vaughan, and the Newtown battery, temporary in charge of Lieutenant Beckham, a young West Point officer of ability. The regiment left Camp Bee, on the Martinsburg road, and joined the brigade at Camp Johnston, on the Romney road, on the outskirts of Winchester. Here, during the last days of June, a further reorganization Company H, Captain William H. Murray: First Lieutenant, George Thomas; Second Lieutenants, F. X. Ward and R. Gilmor. On the 1st of July the army marched for Martinsburg to meet Patterson. On the 2d it reached Darksville, seven miles from that place, where it remained the 3d, 4th and 5th in order of battle, waiting the approachn the 2d it reached Darksville, seven miles from that place, where it remained the 3d, 4th and 5th in order of battle, waiting the approach of the enemy, but Patterson was content with the capture of Martinsburg and declined the challenge, and on the 6th the forces again returned to Winchester, where they remained until the 18th.