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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 46 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 16 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 12 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Meadow Bridge (West Virginia, United States) or search for Meadow Bridge (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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placed himself at the head of his command, and with drawn sabre and deafening cheers, charged directly in the face of a withering fire, captured two pieces of artillery, upward of a hundred prisoners, together with caissons, ammunition and horses, which he brought off in safety. It was, without exception, the most gallant charge of the raid, and when it became known among the corps, cheer after cheer rent the air. The rebels retreated behind the Chickahominy, destroying in their flight Meadow bridge. In the rear Colonel Gregg's brigade, of the Second division, and a portion of the Third division, under General Wilson, were hotly engaged with Stuart. General Wilson sent word to General Sheridan that the enemy were driving him slowly back. General Sheridan sent word that he must hold the position at all hazards; that he could and must whip the enemy. Colonel Gregg's brigade, being reinforced by a regiment from the First brigade, charged the enemy and drove them nearly a mile. T
assed over them in the course of yesterday. The Ninth did not get across until early this morning. The first mentioned corps were immediately put in position as they got over on the range of hills almost east and west, about half a mile from the river, and intrenched themselves. As soon as the Ninth corps was over, an advance of the whole line was ordered. It was pushed forward about three miles to the right and left of the two roads running in a south-eastwardly direction, one via Meadow bridge, and the other through Mechanicsville toward Richmond. It rests to-night within twelve miles of the rebel capital. Wilson's division of cavalry protects our right flank, covering the roads toward Hanover Court-house. and Torbert's and Gregg's our left, covering the roads from Richmond east of Tolopotomy creek. The trains are all safely parked on both banks of the Pamunkey. The movement from the North Anna to the Pamunkey occupied only about forty hours. In that time the army mar
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), General Grant's headquarters, near Hanovertown, south bank of the Pamunkey May 29, (search)
assed over them in the course of yesterday. The Ninth did not get across until early this morning. The first mentioned corps were immediately put in position as they got over on the range of hills almost east and west, about half a mile from the river, and intrenched themselves. As soon as the Ninth corps was over, an advance of the whole line was ordered. It was pushed forward about three miles to the right and left of the two roads running in a south-eastwardly direction, one via Meadow bridge, and the other through Mechanicsville toward Richmond. It rests to-night within twelve miles of the rebel capital. Wilson's division of cavalry protects our right flank, covering the roads toward Hanover Court-house. and Torbert's and Gregg's our left, covering the roads from Richmond east of Tolopotomy creek. The trains are all safely parked on both banks of the Pamunkey. The movement from the North Anna to the Pamunkey occupied only about forty hours. In that time the army mar