Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for New Creek (West Virginia, United States) or search for New Creek (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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our regiments of dismounted cavalry. The victory was decisive, and the enemy's retreat became a total rout. His forces, throwing away their arms, became scattered in every direction. I pursued those that he kept together until after dark. His wounded and many prisoners and arms have fallen into our hands. My loss is about one hundred officers and men. The troops are in excellent spirits, with plenty of ammunition. Wm. W. Averill, Brigadier-General. A national account. New-Creek, West-Virginia, November 20. The brigade of General Averill left their camp at Beverly, at noon, on Saturday, November first The day was clear and warm. We marched to Huttonville, where we camped for the night. At seven o'clock Monday morning we resumed the march. The day was fine — a delightful Indian summer morning — and a march of two miles brought us to the foot of Cheat Mountain. Here are the remains of the rebel works made at the beginning of the war; and here are the marks of the bat
en have suffered cold, hunger, and fatigue with remarkable fortitude. My command has marched, climbed, slid, and swam three hundred and fifty-five miles since the eighth instant. W. W. Averill, Brigadier-General. A national account. Webster, West-Virginia, January 3. The Second, Third, and Eighth Virginia mounted infantry, Fourteenth Pennsylvania cavalry, Gibson's battalion and battery G, First Virginia artillery, composing the Mountain brigade of General Averill, left New-Creek, West-Virginia, on the morning of the eighth of December, and a march of two days brought us to Petersburgh. On the morning of the tenth, resumed the march, after being joined by detachments from the First Virginia, Fourteenth and Twenty-third Illinois infantry, a section of Rook's Illinois battery, and the Ringgold cavalry, under command of Colonel Thoburn, of the First Virginia infantry. We passed through Franklin, and camped for the night on the South-Branch. During this day's march we again