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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 16 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 16 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 14 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Beaver Dam (Wisconsin, United States) or search for Beaver Dam (Wisconsin, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
Bridge. The only tributaries of the Chickahominy are, on the left bank, a small stream called Beaver-dam Creek, between Mechanicsville and Gaines' Mill, and on the right bank a vast wooded swamp, knoere climbing the bare slopes of the hill on the summit of which the village stands. In was on Beaver-dam Creek, in fact, that the Federal general was awaiting the enemy. This marshy stream, which ru while the Federals had only two hundred and fifty wounded and eighty killed. The battle of Beaver-dam Creek, where so many men had been sacrificed fruitlessly, was an unfortunate beginning for thee Federal right, and that his approaching arrival would be sufficient to cause the defences of Beaver-dam Creek to fall. McClellan was expecting this, and had instructed General Barnard, chief of engorder the large clearing on this side. A little before daylight McCall left the position of Beaver-dam, which he had so well defended the day before. The brigades of Martindale and Griffin of More
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Maryland. (search)
slightest fog, shed a flood of light upon the woods which separate the Antietam from the Potomac. Hooker deployed his three divisions, Doubleday on the right, Ricketts on the left and Meade in the centre. The latter was the first to encounter the small division of Starke, which had relieved Hood, and which, sheltering itself behind trees, rocks and wall fences, opposed a desperate resistance to the vigorous attack of the Federals. Meade's Pennsylvanians, inured by the severe ordeals of Beaver Dam, Gaines' Mill, Glendale and Manassas, charged the enemy with impetuosity. The possession of the wood was disputed with great spirit. The fierceness of the struggle was equal on both sides, and the losses enormous; nearly all the chiefs were cut down; and according to the statement of soldiers who participated in that contest, it was more sanguinary than any of those they had hitherto witnessed. But the efforts of Hooker's three divisions, all of which soon became engaged, were supported
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VI:—Virginia. (search)
e extremity of the wood beyond the railroad. His line was formed by three brigades drawn up in the rear of the track, Lane in the centre, a little in advance of the others, Pender on the left, and Archer on the right, separated from each other by considerable intervals. Behind these intervals, along the military road, were Gregg's brigade on the right and Thomas' on the left. Meade's Pennsylvanians were well-tried troops whom we have already seen fighting gallantly before Richmond, at Beaver Dam and on the bloody battle-field of Glendale. As they advanced through the open plain which separated them from the woods, with a brilliant sun shining upon them, a sharp fire of musketry broke out along the entire skirt of the wood; and the Federal artillery having remained silent for fear of injuring them, the Confederate guns covered the advancing column with grape. Nothing, however, could stop them; the extremity of the wood was reached, and Brockenborough forcibly driven to the other