Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Blue Mountain (Alabama, United States) or search for Blue Mountain (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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e country. I hoped that flood would turn toward Guntersville and Bridgeport. The army of the Tennessee was posted near Little River, with instructions to feel forward in support of the cavalry, which was ordered to watch Hood in the neighborhood of Wills's Valley, and to give me the earliest notice possible of his turning northward. The army of the Ohio was posted at Cedar Bluff, with orders to lay a pontoon across the Coosa, and to feel forward to centre, and down in the direction of Blue Mountain. The army of the Cumberland was held in reserve at Gaylesville and all the troops were instructed to draw heavily for supplies from the surrounding country. In the mean time communications were opened to Rome, and a heavy force set to work in repairing the damages done to our railroads. Atlanta was abundantly supplied with provisions, but forage was scarce; and General Slocum was instructed to send strong foraging parties out in the direction of South River, and collect all the corn a
nant-Colonel L. P. Hughes commanding, which came from East-Point with us together, furnished an excellent mounted brigade for offensive operations and reconnoissances. The lines were sealed against citizens, the earthworks overhauled and new ones commenced, and such disposition made of the troops as would insure safety and comfort to the command. On the twenty-ninth, a telegram was received from General Sherman, intimating that Hood was crossing the Chattahoochee, in the direction of Blue Mountain, and directed me to watch well for the appearance of infantry in or about Cedartown. Spies and scouts were sent out in every direction, frequent reconnoissances made with the cavalry, and no positive information gained of the enemy, except the whereabouts and movement of their cavalry, and that Hood had crossed a part, if not all his force, over the Chattahoochee. I ascertained, on the second instant, that the enemy's cavalry had destroyed the railroad at or near Big Shanty, that Whe