Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Brownsville, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) or search for Brownsville, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

over eighteen miles distant, with no roads of consequence opening our rear to the enemy, in case of an advance in that direction. The most feasible plan, then, presenting itself was to avoid the road the enemy had so carefully obstructed, and was so well prepared to defend, and by a detour to the left reach the Arkansas River below Little Rock, and, moving up, assault the enemy's works upon their extreme right, where they were known to be weaker than at the point or intersection with the Brownsville road. Accordingly General Steele placed his whole column in motion on the morning of the seventh, with the exception of one brigade of infantry and two of cavalry, which followed on the eighth. Bayou Metaire was reached and crossed the same day with much difficulty, and consequent delay, at Shallow Ford, some eight or ten miles to the left of the usual crossing at the bridge. On the following morning General Davidson, with a single brigade of his cavalry, was assigned the advance, and
Doc. 156.-battle of Bayou Metea, Ark. Report of Colonel Glover. headquarters Second brigade, cavalry division, Camp near Brownsville, Ark., Aug. 28. Lieutenant: I have the honor to report that on the twenty-sixth August, 1863, two regiments of my brigade, the First Iowa and Third Missouri cavalry volunteers, and one section each of Lovejoy's and Clarkson's batteries, were ordered on a reconnoissance, and to push the enemy as far as possible toward the Bayou Metea without bringing on a general engagement. The First Iowa cavalry being in advance, a heavy line of skirmishers, in command of Captain Jenks, was thrown to the front. Some six miles from Brownsville struck his pickets and drove them about four miles back to their main body; some two miles east of the bayou, killing one rebel captain, (Powell, of Platte City, Mo.,) two privates, and capturing one prisoner. Here the enemy opened artillery upon us, to which ours soon replied. After a considerable artillery duel,