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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 66 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 16 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 15, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Buckhead Creek (Georgia, United States) or search for Buckhead Creek (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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f the Fourteenth corps left Louisville December first, crossing Buckhead Creek, five miles above the church, and passing through Habersham, re. The Twentieth corps left Louisville December first, crossing Buckhead Creek at the church, and passing through Birdsville, struck the railrenemy, until the main column was reached. We moved on, crossed Buckhead Creek, burning the bridge, and halted to feed two (2) miles from the surrounded near Waynesboro; Colonel Heath and his regiment, at Buckhead Creek. The Ninety-second Illinois mounted infantry, Lieutenant-Colentucky cavalry, Captain Foreman, although but a detachment, at Buckhead Creek and at Waynesboro did the duty of a regiment, and deserves greapon Millen, my general instructions required my column to cross Buckhead Creek, at some point between Waynesboro and Birdsville, for which plaered to move in the direction of Waynesboro, and after crossing Buckhead Creek, to move down the east bank, and take position near Reynolds, n
understanding, Colonel Atkins moved on without halting as directed, and the consequence was, that two regiments — the Eighth Indiana (Colonel Jones) and Ninth Michigan cavalry (Colonel Acker)--together with myself and staff, were cut off and partly surrounded. But the brave officers and men of these two regiments, by their splendid fighting, broke through the rebel lines and slowly fell back, repulsing every attack of the enemy, until the main column was reached. We moved on, crossed Buckhead Creek, burning the bridge, and halted to feed two (2) miles from the creek. Information soon reached me that Wheeler was crossing with his entire force. Parties were sent out, and ascertained this report to be true. I now determined to give him a severe repulse before marching further. Accordingly took up a strong position, and constructed a long line of barricades with my flanks thrown well to the rear. These dispositions were scarce completed ere the enemy came in sight and made one o
utenant-Colonel Sanderson and his regiment, Tenth Ohio cavalry, at East-Macon; Colonel Acker and his regiment, Ninth Michigan ; and Colonel Jones, Eighth Indiana, when cut off and surrounded near Waynesboro; Colonel Heath and his regiment, at Buckhead Creek. The Ninety-second Illinois mounted infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Van Buskirk; the Ninth Pennsylvania, Colonel Jordon ; the Third Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel King; the Tenth Ohio, Fifth Ohio, and Ninth Michigan cavalry, at Waynesboro, December fourth, have all, at the various places mentioned, behaved most handsomely and attracted my special attention. The Second Kentucky cavalry, Captain Foreman, although but a detachment, at Buckhead Creek and at Waynesboro did the duty of a regiment, and deserves great praise. Captain Beebe, commanding the artillery, and his lieutenants, Stetson, Fowler, and Clark, have performed their duty well, and to the satisfaction of their immediate commanders. I cannot speak too highly of my staff.
December first, leaving my train in compliance with orders from corps headquarters, marched at half-past 10 A. M. on Waynesboro road to Baker's Creek, ten miles. December second, left camp at eight A. M., marching ten miles camped near Buckhead Creek. December third, left camp at nine A. M., crossing Buckhead and Rock Creeks, camping near railroad, ten miles. December fourth, moved at half-past 6, my division in the advance with its own and Third division trains, crossing railroad aBuckhead and Rock Creeks, camping near railroad, ten miles. December fourth, moved at half-past 6, my division in the advance with its own and Third division trains, crossing railroad at Lumpkins Station, passing through the town of Habersham to Smith's plantation, marching sixteen miles. December fifth, moved at daylight, camping at Buck Creek P. O., having marched sixteen miles. December sixth, moved at half-past 6 A. M., crossing Buck and Black Creeks, camping after a march of eighteen miles. Road badly obstructed by fallen trees; removed them during the night. December seventh, left camp at half-past 6 A. M., and marching fifteen miles, camped at----plantation, tw
Buckhead Church, crossed Janes's Mill and Buckhead Creeks; passed through Birdsville. December 3d at daylight, and was uninterrupted until Buckhead Creek was reached. The bridge over this place warched past Jones's plantation; we crossed Buckhead Creek and camped at half-past 3 P. M. The Twentyles. 2d. Marched at six A. M., crossed Buckhead Creek, and encamped near Buckhead Church. Day'smiles and bivouacked about six P. M., near Buckhead Creek. 3d. Started at half-past 12 P. M. Mar A. M. Marched some fifteen miles, crossed Buckhead Creek, and bivouacked for the night. 3d. Too in charge of same trains. Marched toward Buckhead Creek; camped within one mile of that stream abo near Jones Creek, about one mile west of Buckhead Creek, having marched fifteen miles. Decembern of two hundred and forty wagons, crossed Buckhead Creek, passed Millen prison-camp about noon. Le. Moved at six A. M., and bivouacked near Buckhead Creek. 3d. Moved at eleven A. M., and bivou
ame evening. Found Colonel Moore's bridge thrown over the large Ogeechee, and Major Downey's thrown over the small Ogeechee River, near Louisville. Finished corduroying the swamps on either side of the Ogeechee River. We remained in camp near Louisville until the afternoon of December first. December 1.--Marched at ten o'clock P. M., going a distance of twelve miles, on the road to Millen. 2d. Continued our march the whole day. 3d. In the morning threw two bridges; one over Buckhead Creek, and also one over Rosebury Creek. Took the same bridge up in the evening, and marched six miles on the road to Jacksonboro. 4th. Marched all day, and camped near Lumpkin Station, on the Waynesboro Railroad. 5th. Marched twelve miles, and camped on Beaver Dam Creek, and by ten o'clock at night, we built one trestle-bridge over Beaver Dam Creek for Generals Baird and Kilpatrick. 6th. Marched seventeen miles. 7th. Marched twenty-five miles, reaching Ebenezer Creek; commenc
o something. The greater portion of our command having crossed Buckhead Creek, they conceived the plan of cutting off and entirely destroyingn, Fifth Kentucky, for their gallantry in charging the enemy at Buckhead Creek; Sergeant Emory, company H, Sergeant Pepper, company L, Second valry, who so gallantly fought, so bravely died — the former at Buckhead Creek, the latter at Waynesboro; falling in defence of their country nk.Co.Date.Place.Remarks. 1John W. Forrester,CaptainKNov. 28Buckhead Creek, Ga.Killed in action. 2Burly Willis,CorporalGDec. 1Near Louisvilield, Ga.Missing in action. 13Alfred Daniels,PrivateENov. 28Buckhead Creek, Ga.Wounded slightly. 14Philip Hunt,PrivateLDec. 1Near Louisvillore especially noticed by General Kilpatrick. After crossing Buckhead Creek, I took up position and awaited the other brigade, covering the November, the First brigade was hardly pressed in the swamp at Buckhead Creek. This regiment was ordered by Colonel Atkins to go to the rear
ur P. M. Twenty-eighth, destroyed railroad from Davidsboro to Spears's Station, a distance of eleven miles. Camped before night. Twenty-ninth, resumed destroying the railroad, and after destroying eight miles encamped at dark near Bostwick. Thirtieth, left camp at half-past 8 A. M. Course due north. Camped near Louisville at dark. December first, left camp at daylight, and camped at eight P. M., nothing of import transpiring. December second, left camp at half-past 6 A. M. Camped at Buckhead Creek at eight P. M. December third, left camp at half-past 5 A. M. Marched eighteen miles, and encamped at four P. M. Weather cloudy. December fourth, showers during the night. Nothing of importance transpiring. December fifth, left camp at dark. Camped at twelve P. M. Forage plenty. December sixth, left camp at nine A. M. Camped at dark. December seventh, left camp near Sylvania at ten A. M. Rain all night. Passed through the worst kind of swamps on road until daylight. December eigh
hing camp of division at twelve P. M. December 1.--Moved at eight A. M., and camped beyond Birdsville. 2d. Moved at six A. M. toward Millen. Camped at Buckhead Creek. 3d. Moved at ten A. M., crossed Augusta and Millen Railroad; camped six miles beyond, on the Sylvania road. 4th. Moved at half-past 7 A. M.; camped ar. Marched fifteen miles at night to join the division. December 1.--Regiment marched in advance of the ordnance train of the division. 2d. Marched to Buckhead Creek, and encamped for the night. 3d. Guarded the train. 4th. Marched with the brigade, and went into camp at nine P. M. 5th. Marched steadily all day.d bridge; then crossed the river and encamped at eleven P. M. December 1.--On the march. 2d. On the march all day. Encamped at four o'clock P. M., near Buckhead Creek. 3d. On the march; train-guard; swampy country. 4th, 5th, 6th. On the march; making slow progress on account of swamps and poor roads. 7th. On the