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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
ng and the loss of sleep. Besides, General Morgan had given himself a particular work to perform. He was going to Buffington Island before attempting to re-cross the river—as planned before starting on the long raid. The night march aroung the gle sounds interrupted the inharmonic musicale, and soon the cavaliers were in their saddles, bound for the ford at Buffington Island. On this march the fighting was almost continuous, not only with the militia that industriously barricaded the roargan's Rough Riders see any bright smiles to haunt them still. Unfortunately for Morgan his column did not reach Buffington Island until after nightfall, July 18, too late to attempt the crossing of the river, especially as the night was very dar the old plantation. With about one thousand gallant but hopeless men, General Morgan withdrew from the melee at Buffington Island and rode eastward, closely pursued by Hobson's indefatigable cavalry. Weary and harassed, the Confederate chieftai
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
ch, as well as for soldiery fortitude and endurance. Most of Chenault's Regiment were taken prisoners at Buffington's Island, Ohio, on July 17, 1863. About two hundred of this regiment made a charge under Major McCreary and escaped. at Buffington Island, but were surrounded by a large force of Federal cavalry the next day, and surrendered. A few of the men of the Eleventh were among the band of 300 troops who got safely back to Dixie by swimming the Ohio river on their horses, on the evening of July 16, under the leadership of the indomitable Adam R. Johnson; and a few more escaped capture at Buffington Island only to be made prisoners a few days later (July 26), when the intrepid Morgan made his last stand in Columbia County, Ohio, and surrendered with the remaining remnants of his gallant command. At that time Second Lieutenant Rodney Haggard, of Company A, was the ranking officer of the fragment of the 11th Kentucky Cavalry that still remained with Morgan, whose forces the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of the companies. (search)
ctober 7, 1863, of measles; George Vaughn, died in Camp Douglas, November 20, 1863, of smallpox. Company F. Company F was recruited in Madison County. There are two known rolls of it in existance, covering the period from September 10, 1862, to February 28, 1863. The following roster of its officers and men is believed to be some fifteen or twenty names short: Captain—Thomas Bronston Collins, wounded at Greasy Creek, Ky., May 9, 1863, escaped with Colonel A. R. Johnson at Buffington Island, Ohio, by swimming the Ohio river, afterwards went to Canada in the secret service of the Confederacy, and was one of the twenty Confederate soldiers who made the celebrated Bank Raid at St. Albans, Vt. First Lieutenant, J. F. Oldham; second lieutenants, R. J. Parks, C. H. Covington, died of brain fever at Albany, Ky., April 1, 1863; James H. Trevis. Sergeants—Ordnance, Joseph Collins; first, James Trevis, second, James Caldwell; third, Thomas Dejarnett; fourth, W. B. Benton; fifth