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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Burlington Heights (New Jersey, United States) or search for Burlington Heights (New Jersey, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 8 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Beaver Dams, affair at the. (search)
only the advance of 1,500 British troops and 700 Indians, under Lieutenant-Colonel Bisshopp, and that the barbarians were so exasperated that it would be difficult to restrain them from massacring the Americans. Boerstler. deceived and alarmed, agreed to surrender on certain conditions. De Haven, whom Fitzgibbon had sent for, came up with 200 men, and Boerstler and 500 soldiers were made prisoners. It had been agreed that the captives should be protected and sent back on parole. This promise was broken. The Indians plundered the captive troops, and the latter were sent to Burlington Heights and kept prisoners of war. When Boerstler was first attacked by the Indians, he sent a courier back to Dearborn for aid, and that commander sent Colonel Christie with 300 men to reinforce him. When they reached Queenstown, they heard of the surrender, and hastened back to camp with the sad intelligence. The British advanced upon Queenstown, and, occupying that place, soon invested Fort George.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burlington Heights, expedition to. (search)
Burlington Heights, expedition to. The British maintained for some time a fortified camp at Burlington Heights, at the western end of Lake Ontario. There they made a depository of stores; and to capture these an expedition, composed of 300 land troops, under Col. Winfield Scott, borne by the fleet of Commodore Chauncey, left the mouth of the Niagara River, July 28, 1813. The usual feeble guard over the stores had just been reinforced. Convinced that their forces were insufficient to seizBurlington Heights, at the western end of Lake Ontario. There they made a depository of stores; and to capture these an expedition, composed of 300 land troops, under Col. Winfield Scott, borne by the fleet of Commodore Chauncey, left the mouth of the Niagara River, July 28, 1813. The usual feeble guard over the stores had just been reinforced. Convinced that their forces were insufficient to seize the prizes, Scott and Chauncey concluded to attack York, from which the British reinforcements had just been sent. The fleet bore the troops across the lake, and entered the harbor of York on July 31. Scott landed his troops without opposition; took possession of the place; burned the barracks, public storehouses and stores, and eleven transports; destroyed five pieces of cannon, and bore away as spoils one heavy gun and a considerable quantity of flour. They found in York (Toronto) the sic
was the conquest of Canada. The principal military forces in Upper Canada were under Lieutenant-General Drummond. When the Army of the North, commanded by Major-General Brown, reached the Niagara frontier, Drummond's headquarters were at Burlington Heights, at the western end of Lake Ontario. General Riall was on the Niagara River, at Fort George and Queenston; but when lie heard of the arrival of the Americans at Buffalo, under General Scott, he advanced to Chippewa and established a fortifid by 170 men, under the command of Major Buck. On July 1 Brown received orders to cross the Niagara, capture Fort Erie, march on Chippewa, menace Fort George, and, if he could have the co-operation of Chauncey's fleet, to seize and fortify Burlington Heights. Accordingly, Brown arranged for General Scott and his brigade to cross on boats and land a mile below the fort, while Ripley, with his brigade, should be landed a mile above it. This accomplished, the boats were to return and carry the re
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Churchill, Sylvester 1783-1862 (search)
Churchill, Sylvester 1783-1862 Military officer; born in Woodstock, Vt., August, 1783; received a common-school education; served through the War of 1812-15, and especially distinguished himself on Burlington Heights in defending the fleet of Macdonough when it was attacked while being repaired. In 1835 he was promoted major, and took part in the Creek Indian War; in 1836-41 was acting inspectorgeneral of the Creeks in Florida; then became inspector-general; served in the Mexican War, and for his gallantry at Buena Vista was brevetted brigadier-general in February, 1847; retired in September, 1861. He died in Washington, D. C., Dec. 7, 1862.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Izard, George 1777-1828 (search)
The first division of Izard's troops arrived at Lewiston on Oct. 5. He moved up to Black Rock, crossed the Niagara River, Oct. 10-11, and encamped 2 miles north of Fort Erie. Ranking General Brown, he took the chief command of the combined forces, then numbering, with volunteers and militia, about 8,000 men. He prepared to march against Drummond, who, after the sortie at Fort Erie, had moved down to Queenston. Izard moved towards Chippewa, and vainly endeavored to draw Drummond out. He had some skirmishing in an attempt to destroy a quantity of grain belonging to the British, in which he lost twelve men killed and fifty-four wounded; the British lost many more. Drummond fell hack to Fort George and Burlington Heights. Perceiving further operations in that region to be useless, and perhaps perilous, Izard crossed the river and abandoned Canada. Knowing Fort Erie to be of little service, he caused it to be mined and blown up, Nov. 5. He died in Little Rock, Ark., Nov. 22, 1828.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McArthur, Duncan 1772- (search)
nts were greatly terrified. There he disarmed and paroled the militia, and threatened instant destruction to the property of any one who should give notice to any British post of his coming. Two men did so, and their houses were laid in ashes. On the following day he pushed on to Burford, where the militia were casting up intrenchments. They fled at his approach, and the whole region was excited with alarm. The story went before him that he had 2,000 men in his train. He aimed at Burlington Heights, but at the Mohawk settlement, on the Grand River, near Brantford, he was confronted by a large body of Indians, militia, and dragoons. Another British force, with artillery, was not far distant, so McArthur turned southward, down the Long Point road, and drove some militia at a post on the Grand River. There he killed and wounded seven men and took 131 prisoners. His own loss was one killed and six wounded. He pushed on, destroying flouring-mills at work for the British army in Cana
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Niagara, Fort (search)
the Niagara and made his headquarters at Buffalo, where General Brown appeared at the close of June. On the morning of July 3, Generals Scott and Ripley crossed the Niagara River with a considerable force and captured Fort Erie, nearly opposite Black Rock. The garrison withdrew to the intrenched camp of General Riall at Chippewa, a few miles below. The Americans pressed forward, and in the open fields near Chippewa they fought Riall's army (July 5), and drove the British in haste to Burlington Heights (see Chippewa, battle of). Lieutenant-General Drummond then gathered all available troops and advanced to the Niagara River. He met the Americans near the great cataract of the Niagara, and there, on the evening of July 25, one of the most sanguinary battles of the war was fought, beginning at sunset and ending at midnight (Lundy's Lane, Battle of.). The Americans were left in quiet possession of the field. Brown and Scott were both wounded, and the command devolved on General Ripl
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stony Creek, battle of. (search)
n's dragoons and Archer's and Towson's artillery, in pursuit of retreating General Vincent, who Battle-ground of Stony Creek. was making his way towards Burlington Heights, on the western end of Lake Ontario. Winder took the lake-shore road. He pushed on to Twenty-mile Creek, where, hearing of reinforcements for Vincent at BBurlington Heights, he prudently halted, and sent back to Dearborn for reinforcements. On the 5th he was joined by General Chandler, with about 500 men, who, being the senior officer, took the chief command. Then the whole body moved forward to Forty-mile Creek, where they rested, after driving off a patrol of militia, under Captmp, wandered off in the woods, and for a while his friends supposed he was killed. Colonel Harvey, who took command of the British forces, hurried back to Burlington Heights with his notable prisoners. At the same time, the Americans, bereft of their generals, and fearing a renewal of the attack, retreated towards Niagara with