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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 49 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 26, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Cane Creek (Alabama, United States) or search for Cane Creek (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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ng the train as long as that usually pertaining to an army of seven thousand men. On Sunday morning we retraced our steps, leaving Curran, Stone Co., the furthest point of our expedition, with reluctance at not meeting the object of our search, but with hearts gladdened that we were once more to be placed beyond the danger of starvation. We marched thirteen miles during the day in a broiling sun. Several of our men fell from the fatigue and heat; two reported died from sunstroke. At Cane Creek we found another deserter who had been forced into a Louisiana regiment, and had accepted the first chance to escape. He is a German, and has a brother in the Missouri Volunteers. His statements confirm those of the other deserter. His regiment left New Orleans 1,050 strong, and when he left it, death, disease, and desertion had reduced it to 700. His regiment was well drilled and armed. Three Arkansas regiments were armed with old smooth-bore muskets; the balance with odds and ends o