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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 12 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Capitol (Utah, United States) or search for Capitol (Utah, United States) in all documents.

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ng. As I passed the State Department the other day, I observed on the ground great columns of marble in wooden coffin-like cases lying by the road side; near the White House there was similar food for ruins. Above the unfinished dome of the capitol rises a great machinery of seaffoldage and leverage, motionless and lifeless, and around the very building in which Senator and Representatives keep high debate, lie the vast fragments which at some future day are meant to supplement arch and dorounded before they are completed by the evidences of what they must be when they shall have been destroyed. Before the republic has finished its temples the worship of the deities to whom they are erected is assailed by terrible heresies. The capitol can never see within its dome the Senators and deputies of the Union, of which it seems no inapt type in its aspiring incompleteness. Can any even of the powers most menaced and affronted by the republic rejoice in its researches among the frag