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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 138 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 102 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 101 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 30 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 24 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 24 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 21 3 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) or search for Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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went — the hurricane's breath Was felt in our track, like the blast of death, But we had no thought of turning; Onward and onward the good fleet sped, Locked in its breast the secret dread, To break in gloom over treason's head, Where — we should soon be learning. But brave Dupont and Sherman knew Where the bolt should light, and each gallant crew Was ready to heed their orders. Port Royal, Ho!--and a bright warm day, We made the land many miles away, And sullenly there before us lay Fierce Carolina's borders. The mystery was all compassed then, And the hearts of sea-sick, weary men, Cheered up, the prospect viewing; There is that grit in the human mind, However gentle, or good, or kind, That is always to double its fist inclined, When near where a fight is brewing. The rebel guns waked a fearful note From our rifled cannon's open throat, And our shells flew fast and steady. The battle is over — the strife is done-- The Stars and Bars from the forts have run-- The blow is struck, and v<
Down with the hireling that seeks now to rend The homes which your ancestors fought to defend; Rekindle the beacon ere the last spark is fled, And light up the camp-fires round Liberty's bed! Ye sons of the sunny South, strike to be free! Fear not the Northern despot, nor his feeble frown, Who seeks through his minions the South to put down; Look to your God, from whence comes all power, And seek His aid and protection in each darkened hour. Strike again and again, O ye sons of the free! Carolina's sons to this platform have come: Protection to Liberty, to fireside and home, Their watchword to-day, as their fathers' of old; Truth, justice, and freedom, before Northern gold. Ye are sons of the fathers who bled to be free. Then loud ring the anvil, the hammer, and bell; The South her new anthem, say, what does it tell? Cotton, Grain, and Sugar, have proved threefold cord-- Columbia, the envied, the blest of the Lord. Sun of the sunny land, shine still o'er the free! On heaven's fair a
96. bombardment of forts Walker and Beauregard. by Isaac M'Clellan. Part I.--the arrival. I. Six-and-sixty gallant ships, tempest-toss'd By the angry seas assailed, well-nigh lost Off hostile Carolina's sandy coast, Spread the straining, daring sail; They had come from Northern shores far away, They had battled with old ocean's stormy spray, But triumphant still their course southward lay Through the equinoctial gale. II. Wild surges in mountainous billows rose, Wild the gale its majestic tting squadron their brave flag salute; The veteran sailor and the raw recruit Their deafening cheerings pour; Prone drops the flag from yonder rebel mast-- Soon to the breeze the Union Stars are cast; Avenged is Sumter's humbled flag at last, On Carolina's shore! XVII. Flag of our hearts, our symbol and our trust, Though treason trample thy bright folds in dust, Though dark rebellion, vile ambition's lust, Conspire to tear thee down; Millions of loyal lips will thee caress; Millions of loyal hea