Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) or search for Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Federal Navy (search)
ighting days when steam had hardly been thought of. He is a survivor of the War of 1812, and remembers the days of Bainbridge, of Decatur, Stewart, and Biddle. Even the younger men have no look of the volunteer about them; they are deep-sea sailors, every one. The Wissahickon was one of the Federal cruisers that had put out in search of the Confederate commerce-destroyers. She was in the fleet of Admiral Farragut at New Orleans and ran the batteries at Vicksburg. Late in 1862 she was in Carolina waters and in January, 1863, participated in the first attacks on Fort McAllister. She was in Admiral Dahlgren's fleet during the stirring operations in Charleston harbor and returned to South Carolina waters toward the close of 1864, where she captured numerous prizes, enriching her officers and crew. The sailors on few of the Federal vessels had a more varied and adventurous experience of the war than did those of the Wissahickon, and the faces in the picture, both old and young, are th
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
l of the little Kineo and almost sank her. A few minutes later the ugly shape of the turtle-back ram Manassas appeared almost under the Brooklyn's bows. Had she not changed her course a little all would have been over, but the blow glanced from the chain armor slung along her sides. In The Miami From the time she ran the forts below New Orleans with Farragut, the Miami was ever on the go. During 1863-4, under the redoubtable Lieutenant-Commander C. W. Flusser, she was active in Carolina waters. In the Roanoke River, April 1, 1864, she met her most thrilling adventure when she and the Southfield were attacked by the powerful Confederate ram Albemarle. The Southfield was sunk, but the Miami in a plucky running fight made her escape down the river and gave the alarm. After a shooting-trip ashore — officers on the deck of the Miami An indefatigable gunboat — the Miami eagerness to see what damage had been inflicted, a man crawled out of a hatch on the sloping topsi