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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 138 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 102 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 101 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 30 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 24 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 24 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 21 3 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights. You can also browse the collection for Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) or search for Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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by whom he had children. He also had a family by a colored woman who was one of his slaves. In his will he bequeathed his slave family to a son by his lawful wife, with the stipulation that they should not be sold or unkindly treated. Of these things the Grimke sisters knew nothing until after the war which had freed their illegitimate relatives. Then all the facts came to their knowledge. What should they do about it? was the question that immediately confronted them. Should they-Carolina's high-souled daughters, as Whittier describes them, and not without some part in the pride of the family to which they belonged --acknowledge such a disreputable relationship? Not a day nor an hour did they hesitate. They sent for their unfortunate kins-people, accepted them as blood connections, and took upon themselves the duty of promoting their interests as far as it was in their power to do so. Although a quiet and retiring person, and, moreover, so much of an invalid that the gr