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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 138 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 102 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 101 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 30 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 24 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 24 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 21 3 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) or search for Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Slavery. (search)
and freedom. [Hear, hear!] So it was with indigo. Formerly it was all slave produce; now, not an ounce of it is. I need not give further examples, for the principle is as immutable as the laws of Nature. No article can be grown and manufactured at the same time by both free and slave labor. The fathers of this country thought in the settlement of their independence they had put down slavery: but, unfortunately, in 1786, when it was about to cease, a small bag of cotton-seed was found in Carolina; it was almost by accident put in the ground, and it was found that cotton could be grown, and so slavery was perpetuated. Slavery can only be maintained by monopoly; the moment she comes into competition with free labor, she dies. Cotton is the corner-stone of slavery in America; remove it, and slavery receives its mortal blow. [Hear, hear!] I am glad to see such a society grow up in the land of Clarkson and of Wilberforce, the great fathers of Antislavery. I am glad that England i
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Welcome to George Thompson (1840). (search)
the position he occupied, since he was pouring the waters of life into the very fountainhead of our literature. Neither have his labors in behalf of other reforms been so much lost to the slave. The cause of tyrants is one the world over [cheers], and the cause of resistance to tyranny is one also. [Cheers.] Whoever, anywhere, loves truth and hates error, frowns on injustice and holds out his hand to the oppressed, that man helps the slave. An Hungarian triumph lightens the chains of Carolina; and an infamous vote in the United States Senate adds darkness to the dungeon where German patriots lie entombed. [Cheers.] All oppressions under the sun are linked together, and each feels the Devil's pulse keep time in it to the life-blood of every other. Of this brotherhood, it matters not what member you assail, since- Whichever link you strike, Tenth or ten thousandth, breaks the chain alike. [Cheers.] The cause of reform, too, is one,--distinct like the billows, but one lik