Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Cedar Keys (Florida, United States) or search for Cedar Keys (Florida, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 87.-the campaign in Florida. (search)
on, rice, tobacco, pistols, and other property, valued at half a million of dollars. We took breakfast at the hotel, and on settling our bills, found rebel money more acceptable than our own. It so happened that we could give the landlord what he wanted, as one of our number in searching the trash in the deot came across one hundred and fifty dollars' worth of confederate notes. Twenty-seven dollars of this stuff paid for a breakfast for nine. At Baldwin, the railroad from Fernandina to Cedar Keys crosses the Florida Central. It will be seen at a glance that it is an important place for us to hold. In the afternoon, General Seymour and staff came up from Jacksonville, and later in the day, General Gillmore, with a portion of his staff. That same night, the three cars were loaded with cotton and other property, and drawn by horses to Jacksonville. Since then all the guns and camp-equipage taken at Ten-Mile Run, also much of the property captured at Baldwin, have been sent to Jack
th instant, and will then allow you and the committee to judge whether colored men are the poltroons which their enemies tried to make us believe them to be. The expedition with which we were identified had all the prospects in the world to prove successful, and would have been, if we had come prepared to advance immediately; but as it was, we gave them time to prepare for us when we did advance. We left Baldwin, at the junction of the Jacksonville and Tallahassee, and Fernandina and Cedar Keys railroads, about twenty miles west of Jacksonville, on Friday, the twentieth; marched westward eleven miles, and bivouacked for the night at Barber's Ford, on the St. Mary's River. The bugle sounded the reveille before daylight, and, after taking breakfast, we took up the line of march westward. Our march for ten miles to Sanderson Station was uninterrupted, but about four miles further west our advance drove in the enemy's pickets, keeping up a continuous skirmish with them for about f