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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 148 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 100 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 92 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 92 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 62 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 60 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 40 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 40 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Cemetery Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Cemetery Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 6 document sections:

The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Reynolds' last battle. (search)
ds that gave Gettysburg its strategic importance, and it was Reynolds who first appreciated the strength and value of Cemetery Hill, and the plateau between that point and Round Top, as the stronghold to be secured for the concentration of the scattmand, and thus lengthening out the hours of the battle before the troops came up. It was Reynolds who had pointed out Cemetery Hill as the key of the position, on which he saw that Meade must fight to win, and while some of the horse batteries, shat took his division out to support the right of the First Corps, and the other division took its place as a reserve on Cemetery Hill, and after Reynolds' staff had communicated his last orders to Doubleday and Howard, who in turn succeeded to the comistance, and to the persistent energy of a few of his old officers, is due the statue of Reynolds; noble it stands on Cemetery Hill, looking over Gettysburg, and out beyond to the long line of wooded country through which he moved with his troops, a
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Meade at Gettysburg. (search)
t, the enemy retired. This ended the action on our left, but at eight P. M. it was suddenly renewed on our right by General Ewell, who made a powerful attack on our lines with the divisions of General Early and General Johnson, the former at Cemetery Hill and the latter at Culp's Hill. General Howard, who held the ground at Cemetery Hill, succeeded in repulsing the enemy, with the assistance of Carroll's Brigade of the Second Corps, which had been sent to his support by General Hancock. At CuCemetery Hill, succeeded in repulsing the enemy, with the assistance of Carroll's Brigade of the Second Corps, which had been sent to his support by General Hancock. At Culp's Hill, the extreme right was held by only one brigade of the Twelfth Corps, the remainder of that corps not having yet returned from the left. This brigade, commanded by General Greene, resisted the assault with great firmness, and, aided by Wadsworth's Division of the First Corps, finally succeeded in repulsing the enemy, who, however, advanced and occupied the breastworks on our furthest right, vacated by Geary's Division of the Twelfth Corps, which position they held during the night.
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The campaign in Pennsylvania. (search)
two divisions of Longstreet's Corps gallantly advanced, forced the enemy back a considerable distance, and captured some trophies and prisoners. Ewell's Divisions were ordered forward, and likewise gained additional ground and trophies. On Cemetery Hill the attack by Early's leading brigades was made with vigor. They drove the enemy back into the works on the crest, into which they forced their way, and seized several pieces of artillery; but they were compelled to relinquish what they had igrew's staff, says: On the morning of the 3d of July, General Pettigrew, commanding Heth's Division, was instructed to report to General Longstreet, who directed him to form in the rear of Pickett's Division, and support his advance upon Cemetery Hill, which would be commenced as soon as the fire from our artillery should have driven the enemy from his guns, and prepared the way for the attack. And I presume that it was in consequence of this having been the first plan settled on, that t
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
rew my forces out, that I found myself attacking Cemetery Hill with a single line of battle against no less tha as follows: He then began a heavy fire on Cemetery Hill. It must not be thought that this wrathful firecking us. He replied, pointing with his fist at Cemetery Hill: The enemy is there, and I am going to strike hid for battle can take that position, pointing to Cemetery Hill. General Lee, in reply to this, ordered me to pn the third day, instead of making the attack on Cemetery Hill, we would have been successful. I cannot see, ato a commanding position that was known to us as Cemetery Hill, south of Gettysburg, and quickly showed a formiird Corps, having been halted to let them pass. Cemetery Hill was not assailable from the town, and I determind hill to my left, on a line with and commanding Cemetery Hill. Before Johnson got up the Federals were reportg with him after sunrise looking at the enemy on Cemetery Hill. I rode then into Gettysburg, and was gone some
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The campaign of Gettysburg. (search)
to the different corps of the army to march on Gettysburg without delay. The time occupied in making these arrangements detained General Meade until after dark, when we proceeded to Gettysburg, and arrived at General Howard's headquarters on Cemetery Hill after midnight. At daylight on the morning of the 2d of July, General Meade requested me to ride over the position with him, and we were engaged in that duty until ten o'clock, by which time the disposition of the different corps, as theying of our position and the nature of the country. I had two divisions of cavalry, one in rear of our position, and one on Lee's right flank. This cavalry would have held Lee in check in any such movement, while the Army of the Potomac from Cemetery Hill would have swept down and turned Gettysburg into an Austrelitz. It would have been far better for General Lee and his army if they could have realized that the Army of the Potomac possessed generals fully equal to their own; that the mobilit
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The right flank at Gettysburg. (search)
previous day on the Bonaughtown road, Gregg placed his two brigades to the left of Custer's line, covering the right of the Twelfth Corps. A regiment was dismounted and deployed for some distance into the woods without-finding anything in front. Scarcely had this been done, however, when, about noon, a dispatch from the commander of the Eleventh Corps, to General Meade, was placed in General Gregg's hands, notifying him that a large body of the enemy's cavalry had been. observed, from Cemetery Hill, moving towards the right of our line. At the same time an order from General Pleasonton, commanding the Cavalry Corps, was received, directing that Custer's Brigade should at once join its division (Kilpatrick's) on the left. Accordingly, McIntosh's Brigade was ordered to relieve Custer's, and to occupy his position on the right of the Bonaughtown road. west of the Salem Church road. In order to appreciate the positions of the opposing forces, it becomes necessary to examine the