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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 148 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 100 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 92 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 92 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 62 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 60 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 40 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 40 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 19, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Cemetery Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Cemetery Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: March 19, 1864., [Electronic resource], Pennsylvania campaign--second day at Gettysburg. (search)
the enemy's left. The enemy having been driven back by the corps of Lieuts Gen Ewell and Hill on the first day, had taken up a strong position extending from Cemetery hill along the Emmittsburg road. On account of the difficulty of finding a route by which the movement could be made without being observed, McLaws did not get intevery precaution taken to ensure success. Andrews's battalion of artillery, under Major Latimer, was placed in position on a hill, from which the batteries on Cemetery Hill, fronting the scene of the first day's fight, were taken in reverse, and two 25 pounder Parrott guns, belonging to the reserve artillery of the corps, were plaich they had been posted, and whilst crossing the creek they were much annoyed by the fire to which they were subjected from the enemy's artillery, which, from Cemetery hill, poured nearly an enfilade fire upon them. The creek was wide, and its banks steep, so that our men had to break ranks in order to cross it. Having passed the