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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 84 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 58 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 22 20 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 14 8 Browse Search
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry 12 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Centreville (Virginia, United States) or search for Centreville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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t 9 o'clock A. M., pushed on to and through Centerville, the Rebels retiring quietly before it. Thrwooded valley of Bull Run, half-way between Centerville and Manassas Junction, and purposed to rema and concentrated around the ridge on which Centerville is situated during the 18th and 19th, with r camps a mile or two east and southeast of Centerville, were to make a considerable detour to the ance on our left across Blackburn's Ford to Centerville, flanking our flank movement, capturing ourd along several routes, toward Leesburg and Centerville, until darkness covered the fugitives. We melt away in a night; and so I remained at Centerville, trusting that, by the morning, a sort of rwn up in good order along the slope west of Centerville, and eagerly expecting their advance. But he reserve advanced a short distance beyond Centerville, nearly one-third of the artillery lost migg five regiments sent, two of which reached Centerville before the retreat commenced. Mr. Blair[17 more...]
bel accounts, only 2,500. Stuart appears to have been likewise on a foraging excursion; as he had with him about 200 wagons, which probably returned empty of aught but wounded men. They came up the road leading southwardly from Dranesville to Centerville, some fifteen miles distant, and were foolishly pushed on to attack, though the advantage in numbers, in position, and even in artillery, appears to have been decidedly on our side. They were, of course, easily and badly beaten; the Pennsylvafrom that of his subordinates who spent the Winter in camp in Virginia, while he remained snugly housed in Washington. Gen. Wadsworth, who saw and (until forbidden) questioned the contrabands and other deserters who came within our lines from Centerville and vicinity that Autumn and Winter, was confident that 60,000 was the highest number they ever had encamped in our front; and these we might have assailed at a day's notice with 120,000; and, by taking three days for preparation, with 150,000