hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 50 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 49 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 38 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

ly suspended within the several States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida, excepting only those of the Post-Office Department. Within these States all the Forts, Arsenals, Dock-Yards, Custom-Houses, and the like, including the movable and stationary property in and about them, had been seized, and were held in open hostility to this Government, excepting only Forts Pickens, Taylor, and Jefferson, on and near the Florida coast, and Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor, South Carolina. The forts thus seized, had been put in improved condition, new ones had been built, and armed forces had been organized, and were organizing, all avowedly with the same hostile purpose. The forts remaining in possession of the Federal Government in and near these States were either besieged or menaced by warlike preparations, and especially Fort Sumter was nearly surrounded by well-protected hostile batteries, with guns equal in quality to the best of its own, and
t station. Flag-officer Stringham reached Hampton Roads with the Minnesota, his flag-ship, on the 13th of May, and entered upon his duties with such force as the Department in so brief a period was able to place at his disposal; and illegal commerce by the insurgents, in disregard of national laws, is almost entirely suppressed. The Niagara, which arrived at Boston from Japan on the 24th of April, was immediately despatched to New York for necessary repairs, before proceeding off Charleston harbor, whither her energetic commander was directed and promptly repaired, to prevent illegal commerce from that port. In the mean time, information reached the Department of large shipments of arms and munitions of war in Europe, destined for New Orleans and Mobile. Believing it of primary importance that this shipment should, if possible, be intercepted, and its landing prevented, Capt. McKean was directed to proceed to the Gulf for that purpose; and the Harriet Lane was ordered to Charl
Tuos. H. Taylor, Capt. Cavalry C. S. A., And Lieut.-Col. Second Ky. Regiment. Jefferson Davis' letter. Richmond, July 6th 1861. To Abraham Lincoln, President, and Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States:-- Sir: Having learned that the schooner Savannah, a private armed vessel in the service, and sailing under a commission issued by authority of the Confederate States of America, had been captured by one of the vessels forming the blockading squadron off Charleston harbor, I directed a proposition to be made to the officer commanding that squadron, for an exchange of the officers and crew of the Savannah for prisoners of war held by this Government according to number and rank. To this proposition, made on the 19th ult., Captain Mercer, the officer in command of the blockading squadron, made answer on the same day that the prisoners (referred to) are not on board of any of the vessels under my command. It now appears by statements made without contr
ary 2. Fort Macon and the United States arsenal at Fayetteville seized by North Carolina. January 3. Forts Pulaski and Jackson, and the United States arsenal at Savannah, seized by Georgia troops. January 4. Fort Morgan and the United States arsenal at Mobile seized by Alabama. January 8. Forts Johnson and Caswell, at Smithville, seized by North Carolina; restored by order of Gov. Ellis. January 9. The Star of the West, bearing reinforcements to Major Anderson, fired at in Charleston harbor. January 10. The steamer Marion seized by South Carolina; restored on the 11th. January 11. The United States arsenal at Baton Rouge, and Forts Pike, St. Philip, and Jackson, seized by Louisiana. January 12. Fort Barrancas and the navy-yard at Pensacola seized by Florida. January 12. Fort McRae, at Pensacola, seized by Florida. These forts cost $5,947,000, are pierced for 1,099 guns, and are adapted for a war garrison of 5,430 men. We find, as was shown here the oth