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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Treatment and exchange of prisoners. (search)
nter charges, exchanges still went on, and so we find Colonel Ludlow reporting to Secretary Stanton on May 5th, 1863, as follows- I have just returned from City Point, and have brought with me all my officers who have been held by the Confederates, and whom I send to City Point to-night. I have made the following declarationCity Point to-night. I have made the following declarations of exchanges: (1) All officers and enlisted men, and all persons, whatever may have been their classification or! character, who have been delivered at City Point up to the 6th of May, 1863. (2) All officers who have been captured and released on parole up to April 1st, 1863, wherever they may have been captured. Id., pCity Point up to the 6th of May, 1863. (2) All officers who have been captured and released on parole up to April 1st, 1863, wherever they may have been captured. Id., p. 559. See also p. 564. It seems that the Confederate Congress had refused to sustain Mr. Davis, in his suggested retaliatory measures about the treatment of officers to the extent he had recommended, and so exchanges went on with the result as just above reported, up to May 6th, 863, and with but few, if any, complaints again<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
and three battalions of artillery of about forty guns and 1,000 men; making a total effective force of about 11,500 men of all arms. Washington could only have been taken by surprise, and it was impossible to surprise it, when General Grant at City Point was nearer to it than General Early at Sharpsburg. Sharpsburg is four marches from Washington. It might be made in three forced marches. The sagacity of Mr. Garrett's recommendation that a battle should be fought at Frederick, even if it were lost, will be appreciated. It would have been nearly equivalent to one whole day's march, and extended Early's time from three or four to four or five days. On the other hand, transports from City Point could reach Baltimore on the Patapsco, or Washington on the Potomac, in twelve hours. They could have transported General Grant's whole army from the James to the Federal capital before General Early could possibly have marched from where he was forced to cross the Potomac. In this possi