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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
end. the Naiad silences battery. expedition up Arkansas River. the Queen City captured and blown up. destruction of batteries near Clarendon. expedition from Clifton to Eastport. hard fighting. transports disabled. tin-clads cut up. non-success of expedition. After the conclusion of the Red River expedition the fleet rg of over-security, sent an insufficient force of gun-boats, when trouble would ensue and the undertaking be a failure. One of these cases was an expedition from Clifton to Eastport under command of Colonel Hoge, consisting of the 113th and 120th Illinois infantry, 660 strong; 61st U. S. colored infantry, 600 strong, and Battery G, 2d Missouri light artillery (four rifled 12-pounders). These troops embarked on the 9th of October, at Clifton, on the transports City of Pekin, Aurora and Kenton, and they set out for Eastport under convoy of the Key West, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant E. M. King, and the Undine, Acting-Master John L. Bryant. On the 10th the ve
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 55: operations of the Mississippi Squadron in the latter part of 1864 and in 1865. (search)
this place with his army completely disorganized, except the rear-guard, composed of about five thousand (5,000) men. He destroyed a considerable quantity of ammunition at this place, besides abandoning an ammunition-train of fifteen (15 or twenty (20) wagons about a mile beyond. Your official co-operation on the Tennessee River has contributed largely to the demoralization of Hood's army. Major-General A. J. Smith, commanding detachment of the Army of the Tennessee, will probably reach Clifton by Sunday next, January 1, 1865, where transports are expected to meet him to take his command to Eastport. Please afford him every assistance in your power in effecting a secure lodgment at Eastport; and as I consider the Cumberland now entirely safe, I will be obliged to you if you will have a strong force kept in the Tennessee to keep open navigation on that river. In concluding this telegram, it gives me great pleasure to tender to you, your officers and men, my hearty thanks for yo