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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 12, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 6, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Cockspur Island (Georgia, United States) or search for Cockspur Island (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Siege and capture of Fort Pulaski. (search)
f Charleston except Savannah, which was defended by Fort Pulaski, at the mouth of the Savannah River. This work is of brick, with five faces, casemated on all sides, and has a wet ditch. The walls are seven and a half feet thick, and rise twenty-five feet above high water, mounting one tier of guns in casemates and one en barbette. The gorge face is covered by a demi-lune of good relief, arranged for one tier of guns en barbette. This also has a wet ditch. The fort is situated on Cockspur Island, a marshy formation, surrounded by broad channels of deep water. The nearest approach to it on tolerably firm ground is from one to two miles distant, to the south-east, along a narrow strip of shifting sands formed on Tybee Island by the action of wind and waves. In the light of subsequent events it is of interest to recall the fact that before operations for investing the place were begun the fort was visited by several Confederate officers of rank, formerly of the regular army, who