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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Cornish Creek (Georgia, United States) or search for Cornish Creek (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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ent service throughout. One battalion of the Fifty-eighth Indiana volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Moore commanding, with pontoon train, was also attached to the corps, and was very useful during the march. On the morning of the fifteenth November, the corps marched from Atlanta, taking the road east through Decatur. We encamped on the fifteenth near the Georgia Railroad, south of Stone Mountain; on the evening of the sixteenth, near Rock Bridge Post-Office; on the seventeenth, near Cornish Creek; on the eighteenth, three miles west of Madison. The country for the first three days march was very hilly, and the crossing at Yellow River, Little Haynes River, and other streams, very bad. The condition of the teams was not good, and delays to the rear of our long column were consequently vexatious and protracted. Geary's division was detached, unencumbered, on the morning of the nineteenth, with orders to destroy the Georgia Railroad Bridge over the Oconee River, and such wagon-
ent service throughout. One battalion of the Fifty-eighth Indiana volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Moore commanding, with pontoon train, was also attached to the corps, and was very useful during the march. On the morning of the fifteenth November, the corps marched from Atlanta, taking the road east through Decatur. We encamped on the fifteenth near the Georgia Railroad, south of Stone Mountain; on the evening of the sixteenth, near Rock Bridge Post-Office; on the seventeenth, near Cornish Creek; on the eighteenth, three miles west of Madison. The country for the first three days march was very hilly, and the crossing at Yellow River, Little Haynes River, and other streams, very bad. The condition of the teams was not good, and delays to the rear of our long column were consequently vexatious and protracted. Geary's division was detached, unencumbered, on the morning of the nineteenth, with orders to destroy the Georgia Railroad Bridge over the Oconee River, and such wagon-