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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 42 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 21 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 18 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee. You can also browse the collection for Cross Keys (Virginia, United States) or search for Cross Keys (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 7: Atlantic coast defenses.-assigned to duty in Richmond as commander in chief under the direction of the Southern President. (search)
both generals practically intimated to the Washington authorities that they were scared; that they did not think Washington was in danger of capture by Jackson, and that moving a part of McDowell's troops to the Shenandoah Valley would not succeed in destroying Jackson's forces. Jackson in the mean time, having disposed of Banks, determined to prevent the union of Shields (who had arrived from McDowell's army) with Fremont, and by a series of brilliant manceuvres fought the battles of Cross Keys and Port Republic, holding one commander at arm's length while he hammered the other. By this admirable campaign, in which his great military genius was displayed, McClellan was deprived of the co-operation of McDowell's army, while Jackson contributed largely to the success of the battles around Richmond. His splendid work in the Valley is summed up by one of his biographers: In three months he had marched six hundred miles, fought four pitched battles, seven minor engagements, daily