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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 42 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 21 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 18 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Cross Keys (Virginia, United States) or search for Cross Keys (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
nce he commanded a brigade of cavalry, and it was not until after the battle of Winchester (May 26) that he assumed command of the Line, which was attached to the second brigade Jackson's division, also under Steuart's command. On June 8th, at Cross Keys, he was wounded, and the command devolved on me. I retained it, and commanded the Maryland Line, as a separate organization, during the remainder of operations in the Valley, during the Seven Days battles around Richmond, and until August 12th,he corridors of time. And with the talented Zariffa we say— From the war-graves of Manassas, Fredericksburg and Malvern Hill, Carrick's Ford and Massanutton, Fast the Shadowy Legions fill. From the far off Rappahannock, From the red fields of Cross Keys, Gettysburg—the Wildernesses— From defeat and victories. Tired trooper—weary marcher— Grim and sturdy cannoneer— Veteran gray, and slender stripling, All shall ever be unforgotten by us. The names and gallant deeds of our fallen comrades
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Maryland line in the Confederate Army. (search)
eneral Ewell, of Jackson's army in the Valley, was allotted the First Maryland regiment, Brown's troop of cavalry, and the Baltimore Light Artillery, which thus constituted the Maryland Line. During the Campaign of the Valley, however, in the advance he commanded a brigade of cavalry, and it was not until after the battle of Winchester (May 26) that he assumed command of the Line, which was attached to the second brigade Jackson's division, also under Steuart's command. On June 8th, at Cross Keys, he was wounded, and the command devolved on me. I retained it, and commanded the Maryland Line, as a separate organization, during the remainder of operations in the Valley, during the Seven Days battles around Richmond, and until August 12th, when the First regiment was disbanded—its numbers having been greatly reduced. The Second regiment was organized in the fall of 1862, and during the winter elected Lieutenant-Colonel James R. Herbert to command it. It served in the Valley under G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
and Tennessee. Scarcely had the smoke of battle curled in wreaths above the pines of Virginia, than our brothers in the West took up and prolonged the dreadful note. Then our guns were never quiet; now their roar is heard only resounding down the corridors of time. And with the talented Zariffa we say— From the war-graves of Manassas, Fredericksburg and Malvern Hill, Carrick's Ford and Massanutton, Fast the Shadowy Legions fill. From the far off Rappahannock, From the red fields of Cross Keys, Gettysburg—the Wildernesses— From defeat and victories. Tired trooper—weary marcher— Grim and sturdy cannoneer— Veteran gray, and slender stripling, All shall ever be unforgotten by us. The names and gallant deeds of our fallen comrades shall live forever in our memories and upon the records of the battalion. And now a few words to the present organization of the Washington Artillery. You see around you men who have been in the fore-front of battle; you see the father of the co