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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 132 128 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 82 28 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 76 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 73 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 44 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 44 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 42 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 40 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 40 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 39 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Drewry's Bluff (Virginia, United States) or search for Drewry's Bluff (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Flag Presentation to the Washington Artillery. (search)
hy with the South, until safely returned, some three years after the close of the struggle. And now, officers and soldiers of the Washington Artillery, in the name of General Beauregard, under whose eyes you first went under fire, at Bull Run and Manassas, and—besides your brilliant achievements in fifty-six other battles and engagements—under whom you again distinguished yourselves, on the bloody field of Shiloh, with Hodgson, Slocomb, McVaught, Hewes, and Chalaron, and, later on, at Drewry's Bluff, with Eschleman, W. M. Owen, Richardson, Hero and Norcum, I have the honor to present to you this sacred emblem of Southern valor and patriotism. Its colors are yet as fresh as when it received the parting look of its fair maker. Its value is enhanced by the fact that the upper portion of its staff is made of a piece of the flag-staff of Fort Sumter, shot down by the Confederate gunners, in April, 1861. Unsullied though it be by the smoke of battle, it was, none the less, born in war,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations before Petersburg, May 6-11, 1864. (search)
Operations before Petersburg, May 6-11, 1864. Report of General Johnson Hagood. headquarters Hagood's South Carolina brigade, near Drewry's Bluff, Virginia, May 13, 1864. Captain Foote, A. A. G.: Captain,—have the honor to report the operations of my brigade in front of Petersburg. On the 6th instant the Twenty-first regiment and three companies of the Twenty-fifth under Major Glover, the whole under Colonel Graham, of the Twenty-first, arrived at Port Walthal Junction, upon whwed, the whole arriving at Port Walthal Junction before day. I found Brigadier-General Johnson also at that point with some eight hundred muskets. He informed me that hearing the firing of Graham's action he had marched from the direction of Drewry's Bluff to reinforce him, arriving after the repulse of the enemy. The General ranking me, I reported to him for orders. When day broke it was discovered that the enemy had in the night retired from our front. I was ordered to take my three regi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Drewry's Bluff, May 16th, 1864. (search)
Battle of Drewry's Bluff, May 16th, 1864. report of General R. F. Hoke. headquarters Hoke's division, May 25th, 1864. Captain,—On Sunday, the 15th instant, the intention to attack the enemy on the morning of the 16th at early light was made known to me by the commanding General, while occupying the intermediate line of entrenchments around Drewry's Bluff, and confronting the enemy, who occupied the outer line of said entrenchments, extending his right through the woods in the direcDrewry's Bluff, and confronting the enemy, who occupied the outer line of said entrenchments, extending his right through the woods in the direction of James river, while his left rested upon an elevated position across the railroad, with his masses immediately in front of our right and resting upon the railroad. The commanding General, seeing the right was the weak point of the enemy, determined upon this as the point of attack. The brigades of Colquitt and Ransom were ordered relieved by an extension of my line to the right, which placed my division in line of battle, commencing at Fort Stephens, with Hagood's brigade on the left,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations from the 6th to the 11th of May, 1864—Report of General B. R. Johnson. (search)
rations from the 6th to the 11th of May, 1864—Report of General B. R. Johnson. headquarters Johnson's brigade, Drewry's Bluff, May 31, 1864. Captain T. O. Chestney, A. A. G. Sir,—I submit the following report of the operations of the troopssouthside of James river from the 6th to the 11th May, 1864, inclusive: At 3 A. M. on the 6th instant I arrived at Drewry's Bluff from Chaffin's farm with my brigade, numbering in the aggregate 1,168 officers and men present, and occupied Fort Ste within about two miles of the junction when I received the following dispatch from Major F. A. Smith, commanding at Drewry's Bluff: General,—Our scouts report the enemy at Ware Bottom church, six miles hence. I have already sent couriers to you our front. Communications were received during the night from Major-General Ransom and Brigadier-General Barton, at Drewry's Bluff, inquiring for the enemy, and stating that there had been but little demonstration in their front during the day. The<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Seventeenth Virginia infantry at Flat Creek and Drewry's Bluff. (search)
The Seventeenth Virginia infantry at Flat Creek and Drewry's Bluff. By Col. A. Herbert. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society: In response to invitations given by you in the Southern Histo-Rical papers to officers and men of the late Southern Confederacy for incidents interesting in their character, but lost or submerged in weightier events of the late war, I feel encouraged to give a sketch of an engagement of my old command, the Seventeenth Virginia infa May, in a fog that some of my old comrades remember as one that would have done credit to London. We changed trains after some delay, and the old regiment, in good heart and spirits from its late success, soon found itself steaming away for Drewry's Bluff to be once more united to its old command. On arriving there the fog still hung pall-like over everything—objects could clearly be seen only a few feet in advance, adding much to the confusion. The road being filled with a motley crowd of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A leaf from my log-book. (search)
A leaf from my log-book. By W. F. Shippey. The gray dawn of a frosty morning in February, 1865, broke upon a party of about one hundred officers and men in the uniform of the Confederate States navy, assembled at Drewry's Bluff, on the banks of the James river, Virginia. The morning was very cold, and as the men were formed in two ranks and their arms and equipments carefully inspected by the officers, it was easy to see that stern work and great danger was to be encountered, by the unusual attention given to this inspection, and the expression, half serious, half reckless, that characterized the men who, in those stirring times, were familiar with dangers and hardships. After some little delay in arranging preliminaries, the little command moved off in the direction of Petersburg, then invested by Grant's army. The situation at this time was gloomy and the hearts of the bravest had begun to fail. The enemy was pushing hard, and our brave army, reduced by sickness, death and d