Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) or search for Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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h of this place, tearing up the track, and burning a quantity of cotton stored there, and that upon the arrival of the First Kentucky cavalry, Col. Wolford, from Nashville, Col. Lester had despatched that force in pursuit, together with the third battalion of Pennsylvania cavalry, Major Givan. The Fourth Kentucky cavalry, Colonel Smith, having arrived with Gen. Dumont, and yourself from Shelbyville, and the third battalion of the Seventh Pennsylvania cavalry, with Col. Wynkoop from Nashville; both these forces were despatched for Lebanon, where, within eight miles from Murfreesboro, I met this force returning, under the impression that I had been cut off -six--who were turned over to Gen. Dumont, on his return that afternoon. I enclose you herewith the list of prisoners taken, and an inventory of the captured arms. I remain, Captain, your obedient servant, Wm. W. Duffield, Colonel Commanding Twenty-third Brigade. To Capt. T. P. M. Brayton, Assist. Adjt.-General, Nashville.
Doc. 27.-proclamation of Gov. Johnson. Executive office, Nashville, Tenn., May 9, 1862. Whereas, certain persons, unfriendly and hostile to the Government of the United States, have banded themselves together, and are now going at large through many of the counties of this State, arresting, maltreating and plundering Union citizens wherever found: Now therefore, I, Andrew Johnson, Governor of the State of Tennessee, by virtue of the power and authority in me vested, do hereby proclaim that in every instance in which a Union man is arrested and maltreated by the marauding bands aforesaid, five or more rebels, from the most prominent in the immediate neighborhood, shall be arrested, imprisoned, and otherwise dealt with as the nature of the case may require; and further, in all cases where the property of citizens loyal to the Government of the United States is taken or destroyed, full and ample remuneration shall be made to them out of the property of such rebels in the vic
tion and courage, and they dared us to leave the cover of our iron-clad gunboats to come to fight them in their trenches and still more dangerous swamps and ambuscades of their southern forests. Their whole country from Richmond to Memphis and Nashville to Mobile rung with their taunts and boastings, as to how they would immolate the Yankees if they dared to leave the Tennessee River. They boldly and defiantly challenged us to meet them at Corinth. We accepted the challenge and came slowly aand capable of being made next to invulnerable, Corinth has been added to the lone list of strongholds which have fallen into our hands, without bloodshed, since the commencement of the present year. Manassas, Yorktown, Norfolk, Bowling Green, Nashville, Columbus, Little Rock and Corinth — all capable of a lengthened defence, yet all captured without even a show of resistance. Corinth was indeed a stronghold, and its importance could not have been over-rated. It is the key that unlocks the
rces quickly appropriated to their use. All the barracks, houses, and stores in the place had been consumed previous to our departure. The quantity of shot and shell left behind was unusually small, and the magazines were entirely empty. The evacuation was complete, clean and entire, nothing worth the carriage was left behind. From a farmer, living three miles from the Fort, we learned that our land force had moved the day previous to our arrival to Mason's station, on the Memphis and Nashville road, where they would take the train to Corinth, as they said, not knowing that Corinth was in our hands. Before leaving they had assigned their stores to the residents as perquisites. A detachment of Fitch's men, finding them with large quantities of molasses, sugar, and provisions in their possession, ordered them to haul it to the Fort so soon as they discovered its origin, which the owner did. He professed to be a Union man, and had been in Memphis only three days previously. Th
alacrity displayed in obeying every command. The above is respectfully submitted. H. A. Hambright, Colonel Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Acting Brigadier-General Commanding. M. H. Locher, A. A.A. G. A National account. Nashville, Tenn., June 13, 1862. On Thursday, May twenty-ninth, Gen. Negley, who has been in command of the Seventh brigade--formerly in Gen. McCook's division, but now having a separate command — started from Columbia, Tenn., for the purpose of making anthreatening Chattanooga and capturing or dispersing any of the rebel forces of cavalry hovering around that portion of the country. It was authoritatively reported that the rebels had made a preconcerted movement for the purpose of recapturing Nashville; but that object was frustrated by the energy and intrepidity of General Negley and his troops, as will be seen by the following statement: General N. started from Columbia, on the day above named, with a sufficient force of troops. Gener
f more than----miles from the encampment of the detachment of the Ninth Michigan volunteers. Orders were received from Nashville the evening of the twelfth inst., directing the first squadron Fourth Kentucky cavalry to proceed at once to Lebanon. s. By command of Major-General Buell. James B. Fry, Colonel and Chief of Staff. Account by a participant. Nashville, July 25, 1862. For some days previous to the engagement, our scouts had been scouring the country, and so effectual requesting him to use every possible exertion to hold his position, and if he should fail to do so to fight his way to Nashville. The enemy then divided forces, sending one part to succor those engaged with the Minnesota Third, while the other busarched to Meminville with the soldiers, where the soldiers were paroled and sent back to Murfreesboro. They arrived in Nashville a few days ago, where they intend to remain until they are sent North. I was fortunate enough to get to the hospital a
in getting up food on account of the roads. Very few wagons have yet come up. G. B. Mcclellan, Major-General Commanding. headquarters army of the Potomac, Williamsburgh, May 6, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: Every hour proves our victory more complete. The enemy's loss is great, especially in officers. I have just heard of five more of their guns captured. Prisoners are constantly arriving. G. B. McClellan, Major-General Commanding. Doc. 97.-Union Convention at Nashville. Preamble and resolutions, adopted May 12. Whereas, It is manifest to the most unreflecting that whilst the State of Tennessee was an integral part of the Government of the United States, its citizens were in the enjoyment of the full protection of life, liberty, and property, under the Constitution of the United States, and the laws passed in accordance therewith, and all of their material and political interests were watchfully and carefully guarded by laws, introduced by Southern me
Doc. 97.-Union Convention at Nashville. Preamble and resolutions, adopted May 12. Whereas, It is manifest to the most unreflecting that whilst the State of Tennessee was an integral part of the Government of the United States, its citizens were in the enjoyment of the full protection of life, liberty, and property, under the Constitution of the United States, and the laws passed in accordance therewith, and all of their material and political interests were watchfully and carefully guarded by laws, introduced by Southern men — representatives of our selection, identified thoroughly with all the interests of our people — which laws were decided to be constitutional by the Supreme Court of the United States, the constitutional tribunal to decide all such questions: And Whereas, Because of the election constitutionally of a President of the United States, who received no support in the State of Tennessee, and the effort of that President to maintain the integrity of the Union,
lane which ran north and south, and opened out into the field where Loomis was posted, just where stood the group of trees I have mentioned. The Ninth brigade, Col. Harris of the Second Ohio commanding, was on the left of the lane on somewhat higher ground, partly in the open field and partly in a neck of woods, which extended into the cleared ground, and further to the left was the Twenty-eighth brigade, Col. Starkweather of the First Wisconsin, commanding. This brigade was formed at Nashville about five weeks since, and had taken the place of the Eighth brigade when the Third division was reorganized at that city. I missed the gallant and patriotic Eighth. Falsehood, misrepresentation, envy and malignity had driven it from the Third division, where it had previously won immortal renown and had scattered it abroad over the South. One of its regiments, the Twenty-fourth Illinois, was in this battle, however, and gloriously maintained its honor. The Twenty-eighth brigade s
Doc. 169.-the battle at Sparta, Tenn. Colonel Wynkoop's report. Nashville, Tenn., August 11, 1862. I left McMinnsville with my command on Sunday, August third, for reconnoitring. Leaving the army at McMinnsville, under General Nelson, there were in the command sixty-three men of the Fourth Kentucky and one hundred and seven of the Seventh Indiana. We saw nothing of the rebels on Monday. We crossed the river for Sparta, and within a mile of the river we encountered their pickets. With our advance-guard drove them over the river, and pursued them a quarter of a mile from the bridge. The advance found the rebels too strong, and retired over the bridge. Our men then came up, and we had a skirmish for one hour. Finding the enemy too strong — they numbering seven hundred men and two pieces of artillery — the Colonel thought best to withdraw his men towards the main army, which lay encamped on the river ten miles from where we had the fight. Had they been up with us, we
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