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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
the north of the Tennessee, and thence upon Nashville, requires notice only because it will find asponding Secretary, Major John S. Bransford, Nashville; Treasurer, Colonel Jno. P. Maguire, Nashvilciation have become aware of the presence at Nashville of Colonel Henry D. Capers, General Agent ofittle Rock, March 12th; Memphis, March 13th; Nashville, March 14th. Not a dollar of the proceeds of Chattanooga; indeed, force him back upon Nashville, and, if we should find our transportation ihe enemy's railroad communication in rear of Nashville. This I supposed to be the only practicabollowed us into battle. And now it is on to Nashville. In snow we move from Florence to the task,mong warm-hearted friends. Arriving at Nashville on Thursday, March the 15th, we were met aduation, until this visit of General Lee to Nashville. It was pleasant to witness their cordial gcould be led. General Johnston arrived at Nashville on September 14, 1861, and, acting with his [17 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
sitions, faithfully sustained, ensured the enemy's speedy evacuation of Chattanooga for want of food and forage. Possessed of the shortest road to his depot, and the one by which reinforcements must reach him, we held him at our mercy, and his destruction was only a question of time. The disastrous loss of these advantages must be the subject of a future communication. The suggestion of a movement by our right, immediately after the battle, to the north of the Tennessee, and thence upon Nashville, requires notice only because it will find a place on the files of the department. Such a movement was utterly impossible for want of transportation. Nearly half our army consisted of reinforcements just before the battle, without a wagon or an artillery horse, and nearly, if not quite, a third of the artillery horses on the field had been lost. The railroad bridges, too, had been destroyed to a point south of Ringgold, and in all the road from Cleveland to Knoxville. To these insurmou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
my at the peril of his own life was, of course, Richard Kirkland, of South Carolina, of whom General Kershaw wrote so interesting a sketch. [See Vol. 8, S. H. S. Papers, page 186.] Two unknown heroes of the ranks. Our accomplished friend, Colonel Charles H. Olmstead, of Savannah, has furnished us the following incident which is but one of a thousand similar ones which might be given to illustrate the morale of the men who wore the gray: At the time of General Hood's defeat before Nashville, the brigade to which my regiment belonged, Smith's brigade, Cleburne's division, was detached and operating with General N. B. Forrest in the vicinity of Murfreesboro. Hood's retreat in the direction of Columbia placed the enemy on the direct line between our little force and the main body of the army, and in consequence we were obliged to make a wide detour by a forced march across the country to regain our place in our division line. In this march the men suffered terribly, as large
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
n organization which has its headquarters in Nashville, and is composed of the soldiers of Tennesse First Vice-President, Captain J. T. Martin, Nashville; Second Vice-President, Captain W. Ledgerwooifth Vice-President, Captain Jno. W. Morton, Nashville; Sixth Vice-President, Colonel C. R. Rurteau, Memphis; Secretary, Captain S. W. Steele, Nashville; Corresponding Secretary, Major John S. Bransford, Nashville; Treasurer, Colonel Jno. P. Maguire, Nashville. At a recent meeting of their ExeNashville. At a recent meeting of their Executive Committee to confer with our General Agent for Tennessee, and Kentucky (Colonel H. D. Capersciation have become aware of the presence at Nashville of Colonel Henry D. Capers, General Agent ofern Historical Society, a cordial welcome to Nashville and to Tennessee. That we heartily sympatl Society to hold its next annual meeting in Nashville, and assure our comrades of a cordial greetiittle Rock, March 12th; Memphis, March 13th; Nashville, March 14th. Not a dollar of the proceeds
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chickamauga. (search)
at my bivouac and asked my views as to our future movements. I suggested crossing the river above Chattanooga, so as to make ourselves sufficiently felt on the enemy's rear as to force his evacuation of Chattanooga; indeed, force him back upon Nashville, and, if we should find our transportation inadequate for a continuance of this movement, to follow up the railroad to Knoxville, destroy Burnside, and from there threaten the enemy's railroad communication in rear of Nashville. This I suppoNashville. This I supposed to be the only practicable flank movement, owing to the scarcity of our transportation; and it seemed to keep us very nearly as close to the railroad as we were at the time. At parting I understood the Commanding General to agree that such was probably our best move, and that he was about to give the necessary orders for its execution. Orders came in the afternoon for the march. The rear of the right wing did not move until quite dark. I did not, therefore, put my wing in motion till da
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
o movement before spring. Colonel Dougherty, who has been a wounded prisoner in our hands since the battle of Belmont, was to-day released, and returned to Cairo. Sunday, December 8th.—Arrived in Memphis yesterday. Attended service this morning at the Second Presbyterian church, and listened to an eloquent sermon by a refugee from Paducah, Kentucky. December 9th.—This evening the ladies of Memphis gave a concert for the benefit of the Southern Mothers' Association. Miss Bang, of Nashville, was the Evening Star. The Theatre was crowded, and the Southern Mothers reaped a rich harvest. December 16th.—Entered upon my duties at the hospital to-day. Read ninety pages of Brodie on Mind and Matter. Find it hard to hold my mind to the matter of study after six months of camp-life. December 18th.—Returning to the city from the country this morning, I was overjoyed to see in the morning papers the announcement that England had demanded the surrender of Mason and Slidell. At
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
tlanta, till Hood must leave, for Jonesboroa is gone, and Hardee's heroic corps can stand the pressure no longer. Here Frazer, Vincent, Delery, find their death, and also that unrecorded priest who followed us into battle. And now it is on to Nashville. In snow we move from Florence to the task, ill clad and badly shod. Columbia is taken, and Franklin's ditches are made level with Confederate dead. Bates's division is thrown toward Murfreesboro. At Overall creek it is Leverich's canister rear. Siebrecht is buried on the field. The morrow finds us attacking with Forest, and yielding lines place the enemy in the rear. We lose two guns in running the gauntlet of their line. On that sad day Bennett is laid beneath the snow. Nashville follows, and after the defeat we spike our guns and let down our carriages, roads of escape being left. And now comes that terrible retreat, in the heart of winter, where snow-beaten paths are reddened by the blood of our soldiers' shoeless fe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ur whole visit to Memphis was a charming sojourn among warm-hearted friends. Arriving at Nashville on Thursday, March the 15th, we were met at the depot by General Wheless (chairman of the c, they had not met since they parted soon after graduation, until this visit of General Lee to Nashville. It was pleasant to witness their cordial greeting, and the enthusiastic renewal of their friin, $288.50; Waco, $86.80; Corsicana, $146.50; Dallas, $125; Little Rock, $253; Memphis, $320; Nashville, $467; Gallatin, $52. Total, $3,714.75. Less travelling expenses, etc., $234.75. Total net pro does, indeed, in every good word and work. A meeting of the Southern Historical Society in Nashville has been arranged for May 22nd, 23rd, and 24th, in response to a cordial invitation from the TC. Galloway, of Memphis. 4. Tishomingo Creek (Sturgis's Raid)—By Captain John W. Morton, of Nashville, late Chief of Artillery of Forrest's cavalry. 5. Forrest's Raid into West Tennessee—By Col
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
In the west the guns of the Fifth Company were engaged at Cassville, Dallas, New Hope Church, Pine Mountain aad Kennesaw mountain. At the latter place fell Louisiana's lamented Bishop, General Leonidas Polk. And then in the east began the siege of Petersburg With scream of shot and burst of shell And bellowing of the mortars. In the west battles followed in quick succession. Peach Tree creek, siege of Atlanta, Jonesboro, Mill Creek gap, Columbia, Franklin, second Murfreesboro, Nashville, and Spanish Fort in Mobile bay, Alabama. Meanwhile, at Petersburg, in our trenches, We lay along the battery's side, Below the smoking cannon, But— The enemy's mines had crept surely in, And the end was coming fast. It was smoke and roar and powder stench, And weary waiting for death. So the men plied their hopeless war And knew that the end was near. April 2, the lines were broken. By a singular coincidence the Fifth Company held Spanish Fort, Mobile bay, and a detachment
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
r, and the means of obtaining them. His army had to be enlisted before it could be led. General Johnston arrived at Nashville on September 14, 1861, and, acting with his accustomed promptitude of action, notified the President by letter on the d the removal of his army further south to protect the valley of the Mississippi. Bowling Green had to be evacuated and Nashville left unprotected— Nashville and the State of Tennessee. It was at this time that General Johnston was subjected to thaNashville and the State of Tennessee. It was at this time that General Johnston was subjected to that which wounded his sensitive nature to the quick. The public, uninformed as to his real force, thinking it as large as he had been glad to impress the enemy it was, ignorant of the fearful want of arms an ammunition, they blamed him for leaving NaNashville and Tennessee unguarded, and the Confederate delegation in Congress, save one man, marched in a body to the President, led by Gustavus A. Henry, and demanded his removal, and that a General should be appointed to defend their homes and fires
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