Browsing named entities in Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Fort Delaware (Delaware, United States) or search for Fort Delaware (Delaware, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 34: campaign against Pope.—Second Manassas.—Sharpsburg.—Fredericksburg. (search)
risoners who got off the cars to drink at a creek. In Baltimore they were placed in a prison crowded to suffocation. The people of Baltimore, upon hearing of their arrival, carried them buckets of coffee and all sorts of eatables. The next day they were marched out in charge of a Dutch captain, who, after parading them through the principal streets, put them on board the steamer City of Norwich, and they were soon (with the exception of six who died on the way) within the walls of Fort Delaware, made famous by the sufferings of our soldiers there. One of our men was stripped and whipped by a sergeant, who accused him of stealing. There were 2,700 prisoners there; of this number 186 took the oath of allegiance, and 46 died. Out of the 2,700 there were I,500 sick, and not 200 of them will be fit for service under a month. The Confederate officers were treated with consideration, but the privates experienced the most brutal usage. The prisoners who are alluded to returned
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 80: General Joseph E. Johnston and the Confederate treasure. (search)
belt around his person; but after some argument on my part he allowed me to put it in his saddle-bags. The party then were already on horse, and Good-by was said. The President's party was captured a few days afterward, and upon their release from prison several of the party told me that everyone was robbed of all they had, except Colonel F. R. Lubbock, who, after stout resistance and great risk, retained his money, upon which the party subsisted during their long imprisonment at Fort Delaware. No gold was found on President Davis when captured, for he had none. He could only have received it through me, and I paid him none. The Treasury train was never with President Davis's party. They found it at Abbeville, S. C., rode away and left it there, and rode away from Washington, Ga., shortly after its arrival there, while it was being turned over to me. It will have been noted that the receipts quoted are of two classes-payments to troops and clerks for their own services; bu